Flower power: A children’s book and some natural whimsy set one bride’s floral tone

When she married Will McGettigan, Julie Wallerstedt carried a hand-tied bouquet of white hydrangea, open peach garden roses, white veronica, eucalyptus berry, gray-green fresh succulents, and French dusty miller foliage. Photo: Eric Kelley When she married Will McGettigan, Julie Wallerstedt carried a hand-tied bouquet of white hydrangea, open peach garden roses, white veronica, eucalyptus berry, gray-green fresh succulents, and French dusty miller foliage. Photo: Eric Kelley

Simple, natural, and handmade. Those were the words that came to mind when Julie Wallerstedt thought about flowers for her October 5, 2013 wedding to Will McGettigan.

“My dress was made of raw silk and devoid of any bling,” she said. “And I wanted my flowers to match.” The dress, a custom-made Tara LaTour gown, was inspired by Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are, so Julie turned to the children’s book for floral inspiration.

“I kept in mind a whimsical, rustic vibe,” she said. “And while all flowers are of the earth, I wanted my flowers to be from my version of the earth,” which meant she incorporated elements of California, where she was living, and Virginia, where the couple got married. “The flowers,” she said, “were a mix of San Francisco succulents with Virginia wine country wild flowers.”

When it came time to walk down the aisle, Julie carried a hand-tied bouquet of white hydrangea, open peach garden roses, white veronica, eucalyptus berry, gray-green fresh succulents (echeveria), and French dusty miller foliage.

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