Petal pushers

The most darling of wedding traditions, these flower girls in their Shindig Weddings dresses will scatter petals down the aisle before the bride makes her entrance. Originally, flower girls carried wheat and other herbs to ensure prosperity and fertility, as well as garlic to ward off those pesky evil spirits. The tradition as we know it today evolved from a time when a path of petals would lead from the bride’s home to the church. Photo: Jen Fariello The most darling of wedding traditions, these flower girls in their Shindig Weddings dresses will scatter petals down the aisle before the bride makes her entrance. Originally, flower girls carried wheat and other herbs to ensure prosperity and fertility, as well as garlic to ward off those pesky evil spirits. The tradition as we know it today evolved from a time when a path of petals would lead from the bride’s home to the church. Photo: Jen Fariello

Once she’s got a ring on it, one of the first calls a bride makes is to a florist because be it altars, centerpieces, boutonnieres, or the all-important bouquet, flowers are everywhere, making anyone’s big day even brighter and more beautiful. There was, however, a time when those ubiquitous roses, tulips, and calla lilies weren’t so, well, ubiquitous.—Kate Coleman

Bouquets

Before there were bouquets, there were wreaths, worn by both the bride and groom, and comprised of garlic, herbs, and grains to drive away evil spirits. They often included dill, which was said to promote sexual desire when eaten. Over time, the wreath became a bouquet of flowers carried by the bride, and it symbolized fertility and everlasting love. Today, specific blooms hold special meanings, such as beauty and love, exemplified by the roses in this bouquet by Southern Blooms.

bouquet_FARIELLO
Photo: Jen Fariello

 

Cakes

Flowers have been used to garnish wedding cakes for as long as anyone can remember, and real blooms that match bouquets and table decor can be found to this day atop all sorts of sweet wedding treats like this one from Cakes by Rachel. In recent years, couples have sometimes opted for sugar flowers, which are very labor-intensive so they tend to be more expensive than real flowers. The upside? Sugar flowers won’t wilt, which means they—and the memory of that first shared bite—last forever.

cake_FARIELLO
Photo: Jen Fariello

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