McAuliffe warns of worst case scenario

A photo of Hurricane Joaquin pulled from around 1pm on October 1. Photo courtesy of NASA A photo of Hurricane Joaquin pulled from around 1pm on October 1. Photo courtesy of NASA

On September 30, well in advance of Hurricane Joaquin, Governor Terry McAuliffe declared Virginia in a state of emergency. In a teleconference October 1, McAuliffe and other Virginia safety officials said everyone in the commonwealth can expect between 4 and 10 inches of rainfall, whether or not Joaquin turns east and heads out into the ocean.

A severe rainstorm was expected to hit on the night of October 1 and is being monitored separately from the potential hurricane. The storm alone has officials suggesting that, instead of the originally recommended three days worth of supplies, people across the commonwealth prepare for longer-term power outages, which could last several weeks.

“This one is definitely going to hit us,” McAuliffe says.

He and other officials, including Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security Brian Moran, Secretary of Transportation Aubrey Layne and Virginia Emergency Management Coordinator Jeff Stern, say Virginia residents should not travel if they can avoid it.

Allison Farole, local assistant emergency coordinator, says 3 to 4 inches of rain are expected in this area, but in a worst case scenario, residents should prepare for a power outage lasting 5 to 7 days. She says the storm will continue through October 6. No evacuations are expected.