Everything old is new—or borrowed and blue

Nothing beats walking down the aisle in a dress worn by both your mother and your grandmother. Photo: Jack Looney Nothing beats walking down the aisle in a dress worn by both your mother and your grandmother. Photo: Jack Looney

The custom of incorporating something old, new, borrowed, and blue into your wedding day ensemble is (literally) straight out of an Old English rhyme. But there’s nothing antiquated about its meaning: something old represents continuity; something new offers optimism for the future; something borrowed symbolizes borrowed happiness; and something blue stands for purity, love, and fidelity. Here are a few creative ways to be sure all four items are part of your big day.

Nobody said your something new had to be visible. Perhaps it’s a fresh-bought jewel clipped to a blue heart (double check!) that’s sewn into your dress.

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Photo: Jen Fariello

And who says the traditions apply only to the bride? Cufflinks from a father or grandfather are a personal way for him to incorporate something old and something borrowed. (Bonus points if they have a touch of blue on them!)

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Photo: Jack Looney

This pair of midnight blue shoes will soon be peaking out from beneath the bride’s dress.

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Photo: Aaron Watson

 

And maybe she’s also used light blue thread to embroider the date of her wedding inside her dress, or included something old in the day by attaching antique or vintage jewelry to her bouquet for a little extra sentiment and sparkle.

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Photo: Aaron Watson

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