Raennah Lorne

Raennah Lorne


A round-up of 2016’s C’ville scribes

A round-up of 2016’s C’ville scribes

There’s something about Charlottesville. Recently included in “The Ultimate 50-State Road Trip for Book Lovers,” this small city’s appeal to writers and bibliophiles can be attributed to the annual Festival of the Book, Edgar Allan Poe’s enshrined West Range room at UVA, Thomas Jefferson’s library at Monticello, the Rare Book School, the Virginia Art of […]

John Borden Evans’ “Dead Oak at Night” is part of Les Yeux du Monde’s holiday offerings. Courtesy of the artist

Where to buy local gifts for art-lovers

Because of its resonance, giving the gift of art may be one of the most personal gestures you can make. Perhaps a painting or photograph reminds you of someone, aligning with their style, spirit or personality. Or perhaps it is a functional piece of ceramic that they can use in their daily life. We scoped […]

The Women’s Initiative provides opportunities for underserved women to write about their experiences. Entries are being accepted through December 15. Courtesy The Women’s Initiative

Challenge Into Change writing contest allows for healing

Just two weeks after the most divisive presidential election in American history, many people are concerned that their interests and welfare will be ignored, or worse, targeted, by the incoming administration. The Women’s Initiative, which has provided mental health services to underserved populations for almost 10 years, wants people to know that they are here […]

Joan Z. Rough will read from her memoir, Scattering Ashes, at New Dominion Bookshop on Friday. Publicity photo

Joan Z. Rough pens emotional memoir about elder care

In the epilogue of her book, Scattering Ashes: A Memoir of Letting Go, Charlottesville-based author Joan Z. Rough describes the process of writing about her aging alcoholic and emotionally abusive mother as “the day-by-day knitting together of a broken bone.” In this way, she says, “The writing of the book was probably the most healing […]

Recovered and reconstructed Virginia slave dwellings are featured on the Downtown Mall as part of an installation by Encyclopedia Virginia.

Human/Ties exhibit: ‘Landscapes of Slavery and Segregation’

Throughout the month of September, an audio-visual exhibition called “Landscapes of Slavery and Segregation” provides historical context to Charlottesville in three different locations: the Downtown Mall, the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center and UVA Grounds. Curated by Encyclopedia Virginia, a branch of The Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, each site is paired with multimedia components of […]

Anna Tucker illustrates the fun side of planning

Anna Tucker illustrates the fun side of planning

For all its utility in tracking our planetary revolutions, earthly seasons and our personal development from one sunrise to the next, time may be the human construct that inspires the most anxiety. If you find conventional planners too rigid, digital calendars too ethereal, if you seem incapable of committing to a routine of tracking your […]

Souvenir:A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins
Heritage Theatre Festival
June 2016
This photograph is licensed to the Heritage Theatre Festival for its marketing and advertising purposes. Third party use without consent of the photographer is prohibited.

The Caplins’ dramatic family legacy comes full circle

This month, the Heritage Theatre Festival presents a unique piece in a production notable for its director’s connection to the venue in which it’s performed. Award-winning director and choreographer Cate Caplin, who has worked with the likes of David Hyde Pierce on Broadway, has directed and choreographed six different seasons of the Heritage Theatre Festival, […]

Pauls Toutonghi, author of Dog Gone, will be at New Dominion Bookshop on June 24. Photo: Michael Lionstar

Pauls Toutonghi spins a dog tale with local ties

Every good story needs an indomitable force that drives the narrative forward. In Pauls Toutonghi’s book Dog Gone, that force is a golden retriever mix named Gonker, who happens to be from this area. “I first heard the story of Gonker when I went to my in-laws’ house for the first time,” says Toutonghi, the […]

Offstage Theatre’s production of The Maids, starring Emma Strock and Arrietta van der Voort, runs through June 18 at the historic McShane House. Photo: Publicity photo

Offstage Theatre recasts The Maids as teenagers

Though Jean Genet’s 1947 play The Maids (Les Bonnes) is known as a sadomasochistic, cruel and absurd work, director Stephen Simalchik says he would describe his Offstage Theatre production as playful before he would call it dark. “Something that is only cruel or shocking I wouldn’t want to spend a lot of time on,” he […]

“Shakespeare by the Book” will be open at the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library through December 31. Image: Courtesy of Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

UVA Special Collections features original Shakespeare printworks

Throughout the last four centuries, publishers, editors and artists have created a vast range of textual interpretations of William Shakespeare’s works—from original printings and family-friendly versions to Romeo and Juliet translated into social media posts, complete with emojis. To commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, UVA’s Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library has […]

Young adult author Hannah Barnaby will speak about her work on May 14 at WriterHouse. Photo: Publicity photo

Novelist Hannah Barnaby writes from personal experience

Hannah Barnaby’s second young adult novel, Some of the Parts, published in February, was “partly inspired by my own experience with sibling loss,” she says. Her brother, to whom the book is dedicated, died accidentally, and while the events in the novel differ greatly from Barnaby’s experience, she says the emotional journey of the protagonist […]

Young Adult author Kristen-Page Madonia ventures into new territory with her latest novel, Invisible Fault Lines. “This book hints at elements outside of reality,” says Madonia. “I was curious about acknowledging the possibility of the impossible.” Photo: Publicity photo

Kristen-Paige Madonia considers the impossible

Most writers are preoccupied by a single theme that they revisit and explore in new ways again and again in their fiction. It’s what makes their work distinctive, their style dependable. For local Young Adult novelist Kristen-Paige Madonia, that theme is the threshold of adulthood. “All of my characters are 17,” she says. “It is […]