Laura Longhine



This week, 7/10

“Disgusted with the heat and dust of the babylonish brick-kiln of New York, I came back to the country to feel the grass.” So wrote Herman Melville to his friend Nathaniel Hawthorne, in 1851, and having endured many a sweltering summer in New York City I’ve always enjoyed that quote. But the country, as those […]

This Week, 6/26

The real power struggle in Charlottesville, as a reporter for The New York Times astutely observed in a story about Mayor Nikuyah Walker last year, is not between left and right. It’s “between those who want Charlottesville to go back to the way it was before the rally, when a Google search brought up “happiest […]

This week, 6/19

We’re a city that can’t seem to escape our statues, and at Monday’s City Council meeting they were on the agenda again—this time, the West Main monument to Lewis and Clark, with the figure of Sacagawea at the men’s feet, either cowering or tracking. Paul Goodloe McIntire, who commissioned the statue in 1917, had only […]

This Week, 6/12

As city and county residents decide who should represent them next year, we sat down with someone who’s been there and back—former mayor Maurice Cox. In his time on council, Cox, now Detroit’s director of city planning, dealt with controversies like the building of the Warner Parkway and the proposal for Charlottesville to revert back […]

This Week, 6/4

With over 900 farms in Albemarle County alone, several well-attended farmers’ markets per week, and more than a handful of CSAs, Charlottesville has a thriving local food scene. But one thing that’s missing, says Little Hat Creek Farm’s Heather Coiner, is grain. Coiner started the Common Grain Alliance to fill that gap in our local […]

This Week, 5/29

If you know Charlottesville resident Jamelle Bouie, you probably know him for his writing—first for The Daily Beast and Slate, now as an opinion columnist for The New York Times—or his political commentary on news shows like “Face the Nation,” or maybe for his wide-ranging and well-informed takes on Twitter. You may even see him […]

This Week, 5/22

It’s a few weeks to primary day (June 11), and here in heavily-Democratic Charlottesville, the question of who will represent us next year will largely be determined now, not in November. Among the Democrats, the choices in both the state delegate and City Council races offer strikingly similar dynamics: establishment candidates versus more progressive upstarts. […]

This Week, 5/15

It’s almost that time of year again, when you can magically find a parking space on the Corner and there’s no line for grain bowls at Roots. So before all the students disappear (graduation is May 18 and 19), we pulled together some reporters from The Cavalier Daily to catch us up on life on […]

This Week, 5/8

In five years of living in Charlottesville, I had taken the bus exactly once—as an outing for my then-3-year-old, who loved riding the bus back in Brooklyn. Even once I started working on the Mall, it didn’t occur to me to commute by bus. The closest line to my house runs only once an hour, […]

This week, 5/1

News that no one wants you to know about notoriously drops on Friday afternoons, when reporters and readers are already looking ahead to the weekend. Coincidentally or not, it was Friday afternoon when the City of Charlottesville sent its bizarre press release about the Civilian Review Board, in which it noted that City Council will […]

This week: 4/24

Last Thursday, county schools Superintendent Matt Haas read a letter of apology to the community from the Albemarle teen who made a racist threat against CHS students. Joao Pedro Souza Ribeiro (we know his name because Charlottesville police released it, even though he’s a minor) made his anonymous post on 4chan, an online message board, […]

This week, 4/17

There’s no shortage of alarming climate news, but I was especially chagrined to discover, in the course of our reporting for this week’s Green Issue, that households in Charlottesville—ostensibly progressive, outdoorsy Charlottesville— had carbon emissions that were more than a ton above the national average. Why? One reason may be that the area, overall, is […]

This Week, 4/9

I’m not much of a basketball fan—okay, I’m not a basketball fan at all—but I love a comeback story, and the UVA men’s team’s journey from last year’s humiliating defeat to this year’s championship is as good as it gets. You’d have to be made of stone to be unmoved by the nail-biting excitement of […]

This Week: 4/3

It’s a very Charlottesville story: Megan Read first saw Michael Fitts’ work hanging in the Mudhouse when she was 16, and just learning to paint. “Holy shit—that’s what I want to do!” she recalls thinking. Years later, her own work was displayed there, and Fitts saw her piece “Resistance/Resilience” as he got his morning coffee […]

This Week, 3/27

Last Wednesday evening, as former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu was telling a sold-out book festival crowd that the backlash against removing Confederate monuments was “not about the statutes,” and that white supremacists were “having a field day” under President Trump, Charlottesville police were investigating a threat posted on 4chan, by someone using the Pepe […]

This week, 3/20

Last week, we wrote about Detroit-based letterpress artist Amos Paul Kennedy Jr. If you’ve been to the Mudhouse lately, or a dozen other spots around town, you’ve seen his work: the brightly colored posters with stylized “words of wisdom” chosen by community members (e.g., “If two wrongs don’t make a right, try three”). Kennedy, who […]

This Week: 3/13

A few years ago, Molly Conger was just your average Charlottesville resident who, to be honest, didn’t pay much attention to politics. Now she’s got more than 20,000 Twitter followers hanging on her moment-by-moment reports on local government meetings, which she’s been live-tweeting since December 2017. In this issue, Conger, in the first of what […]

This Week, 3/6

Last week, Albemarle County Schools superintendent Matt Haas declared a ban on Confederate, Nazi, and other imagery associated with “white supremacy, racial hatred, or violence” from the school system’s dress code. A few days later, the city quietly celebrated Liberation and Freedom Day, which City Council established just two years ago, to commemorate the arrival […]

This Week 2/27

Countless studies have found that parents are less happy than non-parents (who, after all, are free to spend their weekends sleeping late, pursuing activities they enjoy, and having uninterrupted conversations). But American parents, it turns out, have got it particularly bad. A 2016 study found that the “happiness gap” between parents and non-parents here was […]

This Week 2/20

In 1986, a young lawyer and UVA grad named Rick Middleton left his job at a national environmental nonprofit in D.C. and moved to Charlottesville. With two other lawyers, a three-year grant, and a small office on the Downtown Mall, he established the first environmental advocacy organization focused on the South, determined to use the […]

This Week 2/13

A 75th wedding anniversary is so rare that the U.S. Census Bureau keeps no statistics on it, Mary Jane Gore tells us. Estimates are that fewer than 0.1 percent of marriages make it to 70 years or more. So this Valentine’s Day week, we tell you about Bill and Shirley Stanton of Afton, who celebrated […]

This Week 2/6

February is Black History Month, a time when schools across the country dutifully trot out lessons about Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. In 2015, a minor firestorm ensued when Orange County High School students connected the civil rights movement of the 1960s and today’s Black Lives Matter movement in a school performance, and an […]

This Week 1/30

The tail end of January can be a tough time of year. It’s cold and gray. The rush of holidays is over, with nothing looming on the horizon except the questionable occasion of Valentine’s Day. Spring seems ages away. While you may deal with this turn of events like me (read: wearing out your new […]