The Hackensaw Boys, with Jim Waive & the Young Divorcees, and Casa de Chihuahua

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The Hackensaw Boys, with Jim Waive & the Young Divorcees, and Casa de Chihuahua

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The Hackensaw Boys have played with Modest Mouse and The Flaming Lips, and have traveled to far off places like the Netherlands and France, but nothing beats a hometown show.  Just as most of the Boys hail from nearby burgs like Crozet and Waynesboro, a good portion of Saturday night’s crowd came from the surrounding countryside.  One girl sported a shirt with the slogan, “Nelson County, Keepin’ It Rural,” and when openers Jim Waive & the Young Divorcees mentioned Orange County, the audience erupted in cheers.

Naturally, two local Americana groups opened the show. NYC-Nelson County hybrids Casa de Chihuahua, who tour in the old Hackensaw bus, kickstarted the evening and got a nice buzz going in the crowd. Then Jim Waive & the Young Divorcees put on a great set, bringing the charismatic country twang that they regularly deliver at Atomic Burrito.  The absence of fiddle player Anna Matijasic was notable (she’s on a European tour with local rockers Ostinato), but the Divorcees filled out their sound with the help of mandolin phenom Andy Thacker. 

Charlottesville can leave their Hacks on: Local honky tonk success story the Hackensaw Boys return for a rip-roaring set at Starr Hill.

After the two opening bands and some fine brews had primed the audience, the Hackensaw Boys took the stage.  With most people ready to get down, the Boys became less a stage act and more a house band churning out dance numbers.  The six members occasionally traded instruments, but they kept the songs coming, the hands flailing and feet stomping.  At times it felt like the floor of Starr Hill might give way under the pounding feet, and dance moves ranged from excited hops to couples swinging arm in arm.

Before wrapping up their extensive set, the Boys jumped down into the sweat-soaked crowd. As everyone gathered around them, they busted out a few more rousing tunes and turned a good night into a great hoedown.