Shorter Film Reviews

The Break-Up (PG-13, 106 minutes) Peyton Reed’s “anti-romantic comedy” about a mismatched couple (Vince Vaughn and Jennifer Aniston) is often funny, sometimes uncomfortably so. Vaughn plays a guy’s guy, the kind who’d like to put a pool table in the living room, and Aniston is a version of her sweet, spunky character from “Friends.” (Kent Williams) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Cars (G, 116 minutes) Pixar blows us away yet again with an animated story of a NASCAR hotrod (voiced by Owen Wilson) who needs to take the “I” out of “TEAM.” Only by the amazingly high standards set by Toy Story, Finding Nemo and The Incredibles does the movie come up a little short. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Clerks II (NR) After a brief, fruitless foray into mainstream romantic comedy (Jersey Girl), Kevin Smith returns to his roots: shooting a foul-mouthed low-budget comedy with a few of his friends.
It’s been a few years since we last saw Dante and Randall. Their older now, but not necessarily wiser, having landed jobs at the local fast-food establishment. Brian O’Halloran, Jeff Anderson, Jason Mewes, Ethan Suplee, Jason Lee and other longtime Smith compatriots return for more ensemble fun. There’s actually a bit of story this time around, but the emphasis is on blistering pop culture humor. (It’s Lord of the Rings versus Star Wars now.) (Devin O’Leary) Coming Friday; check local listings

Click (PG-13, 86 minutes) Adam Sandler is a harried family man (welcome to the realm of Eddie Murphy and Steve Martin, Mr. Sandler) who finds a magical remote control. Get this: With it, he can pause stuff and fast forward it and mute it. Why he could fast-forward a fight with his wife or slo-mo that jogging girl with the big boobies. My god, that plot is clever enough to be a light beer commercial! (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Da Vinci Code (PG-13, 149 minutes) Ron Howard’s movie version of Dan Brown’s religious-mystery novel, in which a Harvard professor (Tom Hanks) and a Parisian cryptographer (Audrey Tautou) try to track down the Holy Grail while being pursued by a crazed albino monk (Paul
Bettany), fails to get a decent spook going, à la The Exorcist or The Omen. Howard has illustrated the book beautifully, but he hasn’t wrestled with it, made it his own. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

The Devil Wears Prada (PG-13, 106 minutes) This fashion-industry comedy stars Anne Hathaway as an aspiring journalist who winds up as a gopher for Meryl Streep’s boss-from-hell, but the two of them aren’t allowed to get much going, Streep’s ice-cold performance getting stranded on the runway. The movie could have been an enjoyable romp; instead, it’s as earnest as Wall Street, only with frocks instead of stocks. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (PG-13, 104 minutes) Vin Diesel, having long lost any level of relevance to this fast-moving film franchise, is here replaced by Lucas Black, the kid from Sling Blade. But, really, who cares which humans are involved so long as you’ve got a tricked-out Mitsubishi Lancer EVO IX to ogle? Black plays a troubled teen who heads to Tokyo to live with his military uncle officer. There, he falls into the world of underground street racing. The film is rated PG-13 for “reckless and illegal behavior involving teens.” In other words, it’s gonna be a huge hit with high schoolers. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

An Inconvenient Truth (PG) Reviewed on page 50. Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre

Lady in the Water (PG-13) At this point you either love or hate writer/director M. Night Shyamalan (The Sixth Sense, Signs, The Village). In this dark, twist-laden (of course) fantasy, the
superintendent (Paul Giamatti) of a run-down apartment complex discovers a mysterious woman (Bryce Dallas Howard) in the apartment’s pool. Turns out she’s actually a fairy tale character
who has escaped from a bedtime story. Unfortunately, she’s not the only one who has escaped from the story. Interesting, but definitely not as scary as you’re thinking. (Didn’t you learn your lesson with The Village?) (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

The Lake House (PG, 99 minutes) Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock emote up a storm in this supernatural weepie. It slowly accumulates power and gets extra points for holding on to its dour mood even after the romantic leads have discovered that they’re communicating via snail mail across time. (K.W.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Little Man (PG-13) God help us, the Wayanses are back in town! Keenan Ivory Wayans directs brother Shawn Wayans as a wannabe dad who mistakes a vertically challenged, cigar-chomping criminal (Marlon Wayans) as his newly adopted son. While the sight of a digitally reduced Marlon Wayans is arguably scarier than the sight of Marlon Wayans dressed as a white chick, what’s most disturbing about this film is how it so blatantly rips off the old Warner Brothers cartoon
“Baby Buggy Bunny” starring midget criminal Baby Face Finster. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Monster House (PG, 91 minutes) It’s the day before Halloween and puberty-addled DJ has been left at home with a babysitter. Which wouldn’t be so bad if our young hero weren’t convinced that the creepy house across the street is eating people. This CGI toon takes a slightly different approach than some. Rather than going for a totally realistic style, the film tries to replicate the almost stop-motion look of old holiday specials. Combined with the film’s retro-’80s setting, it makes for a pleasing flashback. The story, in which DJ and two pals do battle with a (literally) monstrous house, is a bit too scary for very young kids, but it’s loads of fun for those who can’t wait for Halloween. Maggie Gyllenhaal, Steve Buscemi and Jason Lee are among the voice cast. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

My Super Ex-Girlfriend (PG-13) Luke Wilson stars as an ordinary dude who breaks up with his plain-Jane girlfriend (Uma Thurman) because of her neediness. Big mistake. Turns out that she’s actually the alter-ego of G-Girl, the city’s most powerful superheroine, and she proceeds to make his life a living hell. From director Ivan Reitman (Ghostbusters). (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

Nacho Libre (PG) Jack Black has his moments as a friar/cook who longs to be a Mexican wrestler, but the shtick seems a little forced. Black being pummeled by his opponents is pretty much all there is to the plot, but the movie nevertheless has a pleasantly strange vibe. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Pirates of the Caribbean : Dead Man’s Chest (PG-13, 150 minutes)
Reviewed on page 50. Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Superman Returns (PG-13, 157 minutes) America’s favorite Boy Scout is back, and the most enjoyable moments in this $363-million behemoth are when Brandon Routh’s Superman flies through the air with the greatest of ease. Despite Routh’s lackluster performance and Kevin
Spacey’s refusal to ham up Lex Luthor, the movie often soars, but it never comes up with a sufficient reason why the Man of Steel is still relevant in post-industrial . (K.W.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Waist Deep (R, 97 minutes) In this inner-city thriller, an ex-con (Tyrese Gibson, 2 Fast 2 Furious) gets tangled up with a gang after his car is jacked with his young son inside. When a nasty criminal kingpin (rap star The Game) demands a ransom for the boy’s release, our anti-hero teams up with a street-smart hustler (Meagan Good of You Got Served) for some hip-hop Bonnie and Clyde action. From the director of Glitter. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

You, Me and Dupree (PG-13, 108 minutes) Owen Wilson (still hot off Wedding Crashers) stars as a down-and-out best man who moves in on two newlyweds (Matt Dillon and Kate Hudson). Since he got fired from his job for attending their wedding, they feel guilty and are happy to have him stay over for a day…or two …or three …or…  Eventually, of course, Dupree’s seemingly endless couch-surfing ways cause friction with the new couple. A fine cast jokes it up in the
same vein as Wedding Crashers. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

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Shorter film reviews

The Break-Up (PG-13, 106 minutes) Peyton Reed’s “anti-romantic comedy” about a mismatched couple (Vince Vaughn and Jennifer Aniston) is often funny, sometimes uncomfortably so. Vaughn plays a guy’s guy, the kind who’d like to put a pool table in the living room, and Aniston is a version of her sweet, spunky character from “Friends.” (Kent Williams) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Cars (G, 116 minutes) Pixar blows us away yet again with an animated story of a NASCAR hotrod (voiced by Owen Wilson) who needs to take the “I” out of “TEAM.” Only by the amazingly high standards set by Toy Story, Finding Nemo and The Incredibles does the movie come up a little short. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Click (PG-13, 86 minutes) Adam Sandler is a harried family man (welcome to the realm of Eddie Murphy and Steve Martin, Mr. Sandler) who finds a magical remote control. Get this: With it, he can pause stuff and fast forward it and mute it. Why he could fast-forward a fi ght with his wife or slo-mo that jogging girl with the big boobies. My god, that plot is clever enough to be a light beer commercial! (Devin O’Leary) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Da Vinci Code (PG-13, 149 minutes) Ron Howard’s movie version of Dan Brown’s religious-mystery novel, in which a Harvard professor (Tom Hanks) and a Parisian cryptographer (Audrey Tautou) try to track down the Holy Grail while being pursued by a crazed albino monk (Paul Bettany), fails to get a decent spook going, à la The Exorcist or The Omen. Howard has illustrated the book beautifully, but he hasn’t wrestled with it, made it his own. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

The Devil Wears Prada (PG-13, 106 minutes) Lauren Weisberger’s insider fashion industry exposé goes Hollywood with Anne Hathaway (The Princess Diaries) taking on the role of a naive young woman who moves to New York and gets a hellish day job as an assistant to one of the city’s biggest and most ruthless fashion magazine editors (played with snobby glee by Meryl Streep). Think “Sex in the City” with a cuter star and a more cynical outlook. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (PG- 13, 104 minutes) Vin Diesel, having long lost any level of relevance to this fast-moving fi lm franchise, is here replaced by Lucas Black, the kid from Sling Blade. But, really, who cares which humans are involved so long as you’ve got a tricked-out Mitsubishi Lancer EVO IX to ogle? Black plays a troubled teen who heads to Tokyo to live with his military uncle officer. There, he falls into the world of underground street racing. The film is rated PG-13 for “reckless and illegal behavior involving teens.” In other words, it’s gonna be a huge hit with high schoolers. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Garfield: A Tale of Two Kitties (PG, 85 minutes) You have no one to blame but yourself for this, people. Garfield goes to England where a case of mistaken cat-identity has him inheriting a castle. There, he runs afoul of the scheming Lord Dargis (played by a no-doubt embarrassed Billy Connolly) who wants the estate all for himself. I realize you spent $75 million on the first movie, America, but I’m confident you regret that now. Think of this as a bad first date you’re embarrassed you slept with. Just avert your eyes as you pass the theater and pretend you can’t see it. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Lake House (PG, 99 minutes) Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock emote up a storm in this supernatural weepie. It slowly accumulates power and gets extra points for holding on to its dour mood even after the romantic leads have discovered that they’re communicating via snail mail across time. (K.W.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Nacho Libre (PG, 100 minutes) From the makers of Napoleon Dynamite comes this equally odd comedy about a cook (Jack Black) at a Mexican orphanage, who moonlights as a masked wrestler to save his adopted home. The story is simple, the tone is good-natured and the humor is pretty low-key. But Black gives it his all, delivering a surprisingly dexterous (if less spastic than normal) performance. If you didn’t get Napoleon Dynamite, you won’t get this one. Still, fans of the decidedly offbeat are sure to embrace it. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

The Omen (R, 95 minutes) The 1976 shocker The Omen is really just a slasher film dolled up in Biblical raiment. But it’s still a damnably entertaining movie. Naturally, we required no remake; but we’ve got one anyway, once again documenting a clueless Washington family who seems to have given birth to the Antichrist. The cast (including Liev Schreiber, Julia Styles, Mia Farrow and Pete Postlethwaite) takes things seriously, and the direction is notably slick. Still, the script apes the original almost note for note, making this feel like a cover album of your favorite band—good if only for of the familiarity, but not nearly as memorable as the original. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Over the Hedge (PG, 96 minutes) An all-star voice cast (Bruce Willis, Garry Shandling, Steve Carell, Wanda Sykes, William Shatner, Nick Nolte) lends its talents to this CGI toon adaptation of the popular newspaper comic strip. Willis plays a mischievous raccoon who helps his forest buddies adapt to the encroaching sprawl of suburbia. The animation is fluid and the writing has a bit more spark than most of the recent computer toons we’ve been subjected to (The Wild). From the director of Antz. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (PG-13, 151 minutes) The seaworthy crew of Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl returns with Johnny Depp’s Capt. Jack Sparrow on the run from a squid-faced sea demon intent on stealing the lovable scalawag’s soul. Depp, Orlando Bloom, Geoffrey Rush and Keira Knightley are all back on board, joined by Stellan Skarsgård and Bill Nighy. Like the previous outing, this one’s loaded with fun, fantasy and an appropriate measure of summertime swashbuckling. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

A Prairie Home Companion (PG-13, 105 minutes) In Robert Altman’s cockeyed salute to Garrison Keillor’s radio program, Keillor (who wrote the script) lumbers on and off the stage of the Fitzgerald Theater, launching into one shaggy-dog story after another. Despite some amusing performances from the likes of Meryl Streep, Lily Tomlin and Kevin Kline, the movie never quite gels, feeling more like a rough draft than a finished work of art. (K.W.) Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre Superman Returns (PG-13, 157 minutes) Reviewed on page 46. Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Waist Deep (R, 97 minutes) In this inner-city thriller, an ex-con (Tyrese Gibson, 2 Fast 2 Furious) gets tangled up with a gang after his car is jacked with his young son inside. When a nasty criminal kingpin (rap star The Game) demands a ransom for the boy’s release, our anti-hero teams up with a street-smart hustler (Meagan Good of You Got Served) for some hip-hop Bonnie and Clyde action. From the director of Glitter. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

X-Men: The Last Stand (PG-13, 104 minutes) The third installment in the Marvel Comics franchise delivers the goods, with moments of sublime pathos and mystic power. With a cure in the offing, society’s untouchables—mutants with superhuman powers—must once again choose between reform or revolution. (K.W.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

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Shorter film reviews

Akeelah and the Bee (PG, 112 minutes) In case you hadn’t noticed, Hollywood is in the midst of a red-hot spelling bee craze. In the wake of Spellbound and… um, Bee Season, comes this drama about an 11-year-old girl from South Los Angeles who tries to make it to the National Spelling Bee. The story is, as expected, cute and inspirational. It’s also predictable, emotionally simplified and filled with clichés. Think The Karate Kid with a little girl taking over for Ralph Macchio, Laurence Fishburn doing the Mr. Miyagi thing, and words instead of crane kicks to the head. (Devin O’Leary) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6
 
An American Haunting (PG-13, 90 minutes) Donald Sutherland and Sissy Spacek star in this historical horror film about the Bell Witch, the very same rural legend that gave birth to The Blair Witch Project. Sutherland and Spacek are a pair of landowning parents in 1817 Tennessee who find themselves besieged by a nasty poltergeist. The film looks classy and has a few lightweight scares, but director Courtney Soloman (Dungeons & Dragons) doesn’t know quite how to take full advantage of his fine cast. Like The Exorcism of Emily Rose, this one feels more like a made-for-TV drama than a full-on horror story. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6
 
Art School Confidential (R, 102 minutes) Reviewed on this page. Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre
 
Brick (R, 110 minutes) Joseph Gordon-Levitt (“Third Rock from the Sun”) continues his transformation into a fascinating indie actor. (Check out Mysterious Skin for further proof.) In this clever and intricately plotted crime film, Gordon-Levitt plays a teenage loner who investigates the disappearance of an ex-girlfriend in the dark underworld known as high school. The film plays out like a straight-faced ‘40s film noir, complete with hard-boiled dialogue, dangerous dames and double-crossing villains—except that its set among modern-day teenagers. Think of it as Pretty in Pink as written by Raymond Chandler. Gimmicky as hell, but it works thanks to the great cast and the mad filmmaking skills of newcomer-to-watch Rian Johnson. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6
 
The Da Vinci Code (PG-13) What do you want from me? Dan Brown’s book has sold slightly less than the Bible. This is the most eagerly awaited film of the year. Nothing I say is gonna make dollar one difference. Personally, I think the book is silly and director Ron Howard (How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Edtv, Willow) is often a mediocre filmmaker. That said, the film does make Brown’s talky book quite a bit more action-filled. Plus, the cast (Tom Hanks, Audrey Tautou, Ian McKellen, Alfred Molina, Paul Bettany) is worth watching. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4
 
Hoot (PG) Hollywood finally gets around to following up Carl Hiassen’s infamous novel-to-movie Striptease with, oddly enough, this adaptation of the writer’s award-winning kids’ book. A young boy (Logan Lerman from “Jack & Bobby”) moves from Montana to Florida where he joins forces with a few other kids to stop an evil land developer (Tim Blake Nelson) from destroying the habitat of some endangered owls. Luke Wilson shows up as the clueless but good-natured sheriff. Sun-damaged crooner Jimmy Buffet (who produced this film) also makes an appearance. The film has a good ecological message, but isn’t much fun for the adults. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6
 
An Inconvenient Truth (PG, 100 minutes) This documentary examines former Vice President Al Gore’s campaign to make the issue of global warming a recognized problem nationwide. The film recasts Gore as a lone crusader out to save the world, all the while delivering sobering, easily accessible facts about our world’s crumbling environment. It’s a persuasive argument, but one not likely to be heard by Hummer-driving Republicans. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings
 
Just My Luck (PG-13) Lindsay Lohan, backsliding to her lame Disney days, stars in this juvenile romantic comedy about a Manhattan girl with the greatest luck in the world. After a chance encounter with a cute but down-and-out young man (Chris Pine, The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement), she realizes that she’s swapped her fortune for his. From the director of Mystic Pizza, Miss Congeniality and My Favorite Martian. If you’re 14 and female, this will be a very profound movie experience. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6
 
King Kong (PG-13, 187 minutes) Both stupendous and a little boring, Peter Jackson’s three-hour remake of the classic jungle flick gets bogged down in storylines that most of us don’t really care about, but it also contains moments of rare, delicate beauty and some of the finest action sequences of recent years. Naomi Watts gives a rich performance as the victim/love interest, yet it’s Kong who nearly breaks your heart. (Kent Williams) Playing through Thursday at Jeffeson Theater
 
Look Both Ways (PG-13, 100 minutes) From Australia comes this strong indie drama. Spread amongst the film’s ensemble cast are a group of middle-aged characters, all undergoing assorted interwoven crises over the course of one long weekend. The narrative cops a bit from Mag-nolia, but some animated sequences and a few musical interludes add to the film’s stylistic appeal. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6
 
Mission: Impossible III (PG-13, 126 minutes) J.J. Abrams (the guy behind “Alias” and “Lost”) takes over as director for this third outing. Tom Cruise, Ving Rhames, Laurence Fishburne, Keri Russell, Billy Crudup and Philip Seymour Hoffman (doing bad guy duty) make up the impressive cast list. Unfortunately, it’s scripted by the guys who wrote The Island. As in previous Impossible outings, the plot is baroque to the point of nonsensical. The explosions look pretty, though. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6
 
Over the Hedge (NR, 96 minutes) An all-star voice cast (Bruce Willis, Garry Shandling, Steve Carell, Wanda Sykes, William Shatner, Nick Nolte) lends its talents to this CGI toon adaptation of the popular newspaper comic strip. Willis plays a mischievous raccoon who helps his forest buddies adapt to the encroaching sprawl of suburbia. The animation is fluid and the writing has a bit more spark than most of the recent computer toons we’ve been subjected to (The Wild). From the director of Antz. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4
 
Poseidon (PG-13) Reviewed on page 53. Playing at Carmike Cinema 6
 
RV (PG) Steve Martin must have been busy, because it’s fallen to Robin Williams to star in this pathetic, plotless excuse for a “family” comedy. Williams stars as a hapless dad who tries to pass off a business trip to Colorado as a family vacation. Along the way, the annoying clan has lots of wacky misadventures in a rented RV. That’s it, folks. Williams was starting to get annoying on screen, now he’s just sad. Go rent National Lampoon’s Vacation instead. It’s pretty much the same movie, only 20 times funnier. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6
 
Stick It (PG-13, 103 minutes) The rather rude title is meant to lead a certain air of attitude to this film’s subject, the world of competitive gymnastics. Seems we’ve got a rebellious teen (“Life As We Know It”’s Missy Peregrym) who gets herself enrolled in an elite gymnastics program run by legendary trainer Jeff Bridges. Naturally, our gal brings some of her street-smart ‘tude to the balance beam, making this the Bring It On of gymnastics movies. Unfortunately, it’s already been brought. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6
 
Thank You for Smoking (R, 92 minutes) Based on Christopher Buckley’s satiric novel about a tobacco-industry lobbyist (Aaron Eckhart) who seems to feel good about what he does for a living, Jason Reitman’s refreshingly un-PC film lets both sides of the smoking/anti-smoking debate have it with both barrels. Encompassing a trip to Hollywood as well as a kidnapping, the movie gives off a caffeinated buzz, capturing the book’s slightly giddy tone. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6
 
Thumbsucker (R, 96 minutes) This hip, satirical indie traffics in some mighty familiar coming-of-age angst. (Heathers, Donnie Darko and Garden State are just a few distant relatives.) Still, newcomer Lou Taylor Pucci does give a star-making turn as an underachieving suburban teen saddled with a bratty brother, a disappointed dad (Vincent D’Onofrio), a distant mother (Tilda Swinton) and an unfortunate habit of sucking his thumb. When a New Age orthodontist (a surprisingly good Keanu Reeves) breaks him of the habit, our boy descends into Ritalin addiction and scary perfectionism. Freshman filmmaker Mike Mills wants to be Spike Jonze and Michel Gondry, right down to the Polyphonic Spree-filled soundtrack, but he does show potential. (D.O.) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater
 
United 93 (R, 90 minutes) Whether people are actually ready to watch dramas about the events of 9/11 remains to be seen. Director Paul Greengrass (The Bourne Supremacy) keeps it pretty close to the vest with this film about the doomed passengers of United flight No. 93 (the ones who provided Bush with his “Let’s roll!” catchphrase). A cast of unknowns dutifully acts out the events of that tragic day in real time, providing not so much dramatic insight as unflinching recreation. You witnessed it on the news, you relived it in the TV movie “Flight 93”. Now, you can see it some more. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6
 
Why We Fight (PG-13, 98 minutes) Fifty years after President Eisenhower brought up something called the military-industrial complex in his Farewell Address, we’ve become the military state he warned us about. Or so Eugene Jarecki would have us believe in this collage-barrage of images and ideas, a history lesson that doubles as a damning indictment of our plowshares-into-swords orientation. (K.W.) Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre
 
X-Men: The Last Stand (NR, 104 minutes) Bryan Singer,  ( defected to the DC Universe to direct this summer’s Superman Returns, hands the reins over to Brett Ratner (Rush Hour) for this third mutant-minded offering. Seems that a “cure” has been found to treat mutantkind. Naturally, that news doesn’t sit too well with good-guy mutant leader Professor X (Patrick Stewart) or bad-guy mutant leader Magneto (Ian McKellan). You can also add Beast (Kelsey Grammer) and Angel (Ben Foster) to the mutant mix this time around. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

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1) Don’t call people names or accuse them of things you cannot support.
2) Don’t direct foul language, racial slurs, or offensive terms at other commenters or our staff.
3) Don’t use the discussion on our site for commercial (or shameless personal) promotion.

We reserve the right to remove posts and ban commenters who violate any of the rules listed above, or the spirit of the discussion. We’re trying to create a safe space for a wide range of people to express themselves, and we believe that goal can only be achieved through thoughtful, sensitive editorial control.

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Shorter Film Reviews

Akeelah and the Bee (PG, 112 minutes) In case you hadn’t noticed, Hollywood is in the midst of a red-hot spelling bee craze. In the wake of Spellbound and… um, Bee Season, comes this drama about an 11-year-old girl from South Los Angeles who tries to make it to the National Spelling Bee. The story is, as expected, cute and inspirational. It’s also predictable, emotionally simplified and filled with clichés. Think The Karate Kid with a little girl taking over for Ralph Macchio, Laurence Fishburn doing the Mr. Miyagi thing, and words instead of crane kicks to the head. (Devin O’Leary) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

American Dreamz (PG-13, 107 minutes) Paul Weitz’ satiric jab at our country’s military-entertainment complex imagines an “American Idol”-like TV program with the president of the United States (Dennis Quaid going way too easy on George W. Bush) as a guest judge. Hugh Grant does a passable impersonation of Simon Cowell, but it’s not enough to make up for the fact that Weitz shows no ability to take this thing over the top, where it belongs. (Kent Williams) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

An American Haunting (PG-13, 90 minutes) Donald Sutherland and Sissy Spacek star in this historical horror film about the Bell Witch, the very same rural legend that gave birth to The Blair Witch Project. Sutherland and Spacek are a pair of landowning parents in 1817 Tennessee who find themselves besieged by a nasty poltergeist. The film looks classy and has a few lightweight scares, but director Courtney Soloman (Dungeons & Dragons) doesn’t know quite how to take full advantage of his fine cast. Like The Exorcism of Emily Rose, this one feels more like a made-for-TV drama than a full-on horror story. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

The Benchwarmers (PG-13, 80 minutes) A trio of dorky dudes (David Spade, Rob Schneider and Napoleon Dynamite’s Jon Heder) try to make up for their pathetic childhoods by forming a three-man baseball team to compete against standard Little League teams. This one’s only funny if you like the lamest of output from Adam Sandler’s drinking buddies. (It’s written by Alan Covert, who gave us the glory of Grandma’s Boy.) (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Capote (R, 114 minutes) Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood told the story of a Kansas farm family that was slaughtered by a pair of excons, and Bennett Miller’s quietly enthralling Capote gives us the story behind the story, the years-long ordeal during which Capote had to use every trick in the reporter’s notebook to get people to talk to him. As Capote, Oscar winnter Philip Seymour Hoffman is simply brilliant, conveying both the tenderness and the toughness of a man who never recovered from his greatest work. (K.W.) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater

Friends with Money (R, 88 minutes) Nicole Holofcener’s bittersweet comedy about a group of Los Angeles friends (Frances McDormand, Catherine Keener, Joan Cusack and Jennifer Aniston) who occupy different rungs on the ladder of success is strangely refreshing, with its cold stare at the ravages of middle age. You may not buy these women as friends for life, but Holofcener goes deep inside female insecurity. (K.W.) Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre

Goal! The Dream Begins (PG, 118 minutes) A football-loving (“soccer loving” to you and me) Mexican immigrant living in Los Angeles gets spotted by a scout for England’s legendary Newcastle United team. The usual sporting trials and tribulations follow, capped off with the typical stand-up-andcheer ending. If you’re a massive fan of European soccer, you’ll be mightily impressed with cameos by the likes of Alan Shearer, David Beckham, Milan Baros, Raul Gonzalez, Zinédine Zidane, Titus Bramble and Sven-Göran Eriksson. And if you have no freaking idea who Sven-Göran Eriksson is, I’m guessing you won’t be watching this movie. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

Good Night, and Good Luck (PG, 93 minutes) When Edward R. Murrow, America’s most respected broadcast journalist in the 1950s, went after Sen. Joseph McCarthy, the man who’d whipped the country into a frenzy of anti-Communist paranoia, it was one of the golden moments in the history of television, and George Clooney, who directed, cowrote and stars as Murrow’s producer, has created a lively, artful profile in courage. We aren’t given much personal information about Murrow, but David Strathairn’s quietly confident performance has just enough charisma to help us understand why men and women would be willing to follow him off the edge of cliff. (K.W.) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater

Hoot (PG) Hollywood finally gets around to following up Carl Hiassen’s infamous novelto- movie Striptease with, oddly enough, this adaptation of the writer’s award-winning kids’ book. A young boy (Logan Lerman from “Jack & Bobby”) moves from Montana to Florida where he joins forces with a few other kids to stop an evil land developer (Tim Blake Nelson) from destroying the habitat of some endangered owls. Luke Wilson shows up as the clueless but good-natured sheriff. Sun-damaged crooner Jimmy Buffet (who produced this film) also makes an appearance. The film has a good ecological message, but isn’t much fun for the adults. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Ice Age: The Meltdown (PG, 91 minutes) Gee, that was a pretty short ice age. Seems that the Earth is now warming back up again, and our heroes, the mastodon, the sabertoothed tiger, the sloth and the squirrel thing, must find a new home to live in. Queen Latifah, Jay Leno and Seann William Scott add their voices to the cast this time around. If your kids were entertained by the first one, they’ll be entertained by this one. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Inside Man (R, 129 minutes) Spike Lee tries his hand at a more mainstream thriller with this intermittently successful heist drama. A gang of bank robbers led by Clive Owen takes over a bank in Manhattan. Hostage negotiator Denzel Washington is called in to handle the situation. Naturally, there are lots of twists and turns along the way as the bank robbers scheme to get out with the dough. Do they have a secret plan? Will it be patently obvious to most viewers? Washington does good work (and Jodie Foster drops by for a short time), but Lee isn’t quite prepared for this sort of adrenaline-filled cinema. At least he avoids some of the more egregious genre clichés. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Just My Luck (PG-13) Lindsay Lohan, backsliding to her lame Disney days, stars in this juvenile romantic comedy about a Manhattan girl with the greatest luck in the world. After a chance encounter with a cute but down-and-out young man (Chris Pine, The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement), she realizes that she’s swapped her fortune for his. From the director of Mystic Pizza, Miss Congeniality and My Favorite Martian. If you’re 14 and female, this will be a very profound movie experience. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

Lucky Number Slevin (R, 109 minutes) Scotsman Paul McGuigan (Gangster No. 1) contributes this crazed crime story about a case of mistaken identity that leaves a downon- his luck slob (Josh Hartnett) stuck in the middle of a gang war between Ben Kingsley and Morgan Freeman (scary). To make matters worse, he’s being pursued by an infamous assassin (Bruce Willis). Our boy Slevin’s situation is slightly ameliorated by the attentions of Lucy Liu, but the body count continues to rise. At times the film becomes wrapped up in its own twisty cleverness—which is wedged somewhere between the filmy smartness of Hitchcock and the showy self-awareness of Tarantino. Still, it’s a hell of zippy ride. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Mission: Impossible III (PG-13, 126 minutes) J.J. Abrams (the guy behind “Alias” and “Lost”) takes over as director for this third outing. Tom Cruise, Ving Rhames, Laurence Fishburne, Keri Russell, Billy Crudup and Philip Seymour Hoffman (doing bad guy duty) make up the impressive cast list. Unfortunately, it’s scripted by the guys who wrote The Island. As in previous Impossible outings, the plot is baroque to the point of nonsensical. The explosions look pretty, though. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6


Poseidon (PG-13) Mere months after the TV movie remake of The Poseidon Adventure (starring Steve Guttenberg) comes this big-budget theatrical remake. This one tries to match the B-list starpower of the 1972 original. But Josh Lucas, Kurt Russell and Richard Dreyfuss aren’t enough to make up for the loss of Shelly Winters and Ernest Borgnine. Still, director Wolfgang Peterson (Das Boot) knows his way around underwater and manages to craft a respectable, tension- filled disaster flick. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

Russian Dolls (NR, 125 minutes) Cédric Klapisch follows up his 2002 hit L’Aubere Espagnole with this multilingual sequel, which picks up with a group of students five years after their college graduation. On the cusp of 30, our characters are marginally more mature and now find themselves more centered on work and romance. The original cast (including Amelie’s Audrey Tautou) returns. The film itself is warm and occasionally amusing, but the script remains frustratingly superficial. In English, Russian, French, Spanish and Italian with English subtitles. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings


RV (PG) Steve Martin must have been busy, because it’s fallen to Robin Williams to star in this pathetic, plotless excuse for a “family” comedy. Williams stars as a hapless dad who tries to pass off a business trip to Colorado as a family vacation. Along the way, the annoying clan has lots of wacky misadventures in a rented RV. That’s it, folks. Williams was starting to get annoying on screen, now he’s just sad. Go rent National Lampoon’s Vacation instead. It’s pretty much the same movie, only 20 times funnier. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4


Scary Movie 4 (PG-13) David Zucker (who pioneered this sort of spoofy genre back in 1980 with Airplane!) returns for yet another outing in the Scary Movie franchise. Anna Faris returns as well as the intrepid reporter trying to find out why so many wacky things are happening. There are send-ups of Saw, The Grudge, War of the Worlds, and others too numerous to count. Expect plenty of cameos as well, including a fairly clever sequence involving Shaquille O’Neal and Dr. Phil. The rest revolves around the usual lowbrow sex and potty humor that the kids so dearly love. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Sentinel (PG-13) Kiefer Sutherland, taking time off from his TV gig as a government agent in a frantic race to save the president from assassination, signs on for this theatrical thriller as a government agent in a frantic race to save the president from assassination. Michael Douglas is Sutherland’s foil and former mentor, a disgraced special agent to the White House, who is being framed in the murderous conspiracy (or is he?). Eva Longoria (“Desperate Housewives”) tags along for eye candy. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4


Silent Hill (R) For those of you who already have BloodRayne and Doom on DVD (or, more likely, PSP), here’s the latest videogame to make the leap to the silver screen. Radha Mitchell (Pitch Black) stars as a woman searching for her sick daughter in the creepy, fog-enshrouded environs of a mysteriously deserted town. (Deserted, of course, except for all the demons, monsters, ghosts and what-have-you.) At least Uwe Boll (Alone in the Dark, House of the Dead, BloodRayne) is not involved. French director Christophe Gans (Brotherhood of the Wolf) lends some polish to the rather predictable goings on. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Stick It (PG-13, 103 minutes) The rather rude title is meant to lead a certain air of attitude to this film’s subject, the world of competitive gymnastics. Seems we’ve got a rebellious teen (“Life As We Know It”s Missy Peregrym) who gets herself enrolled in an elite gymnastics program run by legendary trainer Jeff Bridges. Naturally, our gal brings some of her street-smart ‘tude to the balance beam, making this the Bring It On of gymnastics movies. Unfortunately, it’s already been brought. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Thank You for Smoking (R, 92 minutes) Based on Christopher Buckley’s satiric novel about a tobacco-industry lobbyist (Aaron Eckhart) who seems to feel good about what he does for a living, Jason Reitman’s refreshingly un-PC film lets both sides of the smoking/ anti-smoking debate have it with both barrels. Encompassing a trip to Hollywood as well as a kidnapping, the movie gives off a caffeinated buzz, capturing the book’s slightly giddy tone. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6


United 93 (R, 111 minutes) Reviewed on page 49. Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Wild (G, 94 minutes) Despite the fact that this computer-animated toon features a group of animals (including a lion and a giraffe) escaping from the New York City Zoo and making a madcap trek to the wilds of Africa, Disney would like to inform you that this is nothing like last year’s Madagascar. Which, of course, it is. The voice cast (including Kiefer Sutherland, Janeane Garofalo, Eddie Izzard and William Shatner) has fun at least, and there are enough fart jokes to keep the kids laughing. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

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Shorter film reviews

Akeelah and the Bee (PG, 112 minutes) In case you hadn’t noticed, Hollywood is in the midst of a red-hot spelling bee craze. In the wake of Spellbound and… um, Bee Season, comes this drama about an 11-year-old girl from South Los Angeles who tries to make it to the National Spelling Bee. The story is, as expected, cute and inspirational. It’s also predictable, emotionally simplified and filled with clichés. Think The Karate Kid with a little girl taking over for Ralph Macchio, Laurence Fishburne doing the Mr. Miyagi thing, and words instead of crane kicks to the head. (Devin O’Leary) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6
American Dreamz (PG-13, 107 minutes) Reviewed on page 57. Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

An American Haunting (PG-13, 90 minutes) Donald Sutherland and Sissy Spacek star in this historical horror film about the Bell Witch, the very same rural legend that gave birth to The Blair Witch Project. Sutherland and Spacek are a pair of landowning parents in 1817 Tennessee who find themselves besieged by a nasty poltergeist. The film looks classy and has a few lightweight scares, but director Courtney Soloman (Dungeons & Dragons) doesn’t know quite how to take full advantage of his fine cast. Like The Exorcism of Emily Rose, this one feels more like a made-for-TV drama than a full-on horror story. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

The Benchwarmers (PG-13, 80 minutes) A trio of dorky dudes (David Spade, Rob Schneider and Napoleon Dynamite’s Jon Heder) try to make up for their pathetic childhoods by forming a three-man baseball team to compete against standard Little League teams. This one’s only funny if you like the lamest of output from Adam Sandler’s drinking buddies. (It’s written by Alan Covert, who gave us the glory of Grandma’s Boy.) (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6
Capote (R, 114 minutes) Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood told the story of a Kansas farm family that was slaughtered by a pair of ex-cons, and Bennett Miller’s quietly enthralling Capote gives us the story behind the story, the years-long ordeal during which Capote had to use every trick in the reporter’s notebook to get people to talk to him. As Capote, Oscar winner Philip Seymour Hoffman is simply brilliant, conveying both the tenderness and the toughness of a man who never recovered from his greatest work. (Kent Williams) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater

Friends With Money (R, 88 minutes) Reviewed on page 57. Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre
Good Night, and Good Luck (PG, 93 minutes) When Edward R. Murrow, America’s most respected broadcast journalist in the 1950s, went after Sen. Joseph McCarthy, the man who’d whipped the country into a frenzy of anti-Communist paranoia, it was one of the golden moments in the history of television, and George Clooney, who directed, co-wrote and stars as Murrow’s producer, has created a lively, artful profile in courage. We aren’t given much personal information about Murrow, but David Strathairn’s quietly confident performance has just enough charisma to help us understand why men and women would be willing to follow him off the edge of cliff. (K.W.) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater

Hoot (PG) Hollywood finally gets around to following up Carl Hiassen’s infamous novel-to-movie Striptease with, oddly enough, this adaptation of the writer’s award-winning kids’ book. A young boy (Logan Lerman from “Jack & Bobby”) moves from Montana to Florida where he joins forces with a few other kids to stop an evil land developer (Tim Blake Nelson) from destroying the habitat of some endangered owls. Luke Wilson shows up as the clueless but good-natured sheriff. Sun-damaged crooner Jimmy Buffet (who produced this film) also makes an appearance. The film has a good ecological message, but isn’t much fun for the adults. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

Ice Age: The Meltdown (PG, 91 minutes) Gee, that was a pretty short ice age. Seems that the Earth is now warming back up again, and our heroes, the mastodon, the saber-toothed tiger, the sloth and the squirrel thing, must find a new home to live in. Queen Latifah, Jay Leno and Seann William Scott add their voices to the cast this time around. If your kids were entertained by the first one, they’ll be entertained by this one. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Inside Man (R, 129 minutes) Spike Lee tries his hand at a more mainstream thriller with this intermittently successful heist drama. A gang of bank robbers led by Clive Owen takes over a bank in Manhattan. Hostage negotiator Denzel Washington is called in to handle the situation. Naturally, there are lots of twists and turns along the way as the bank robbers scheme to get out with the dough. Do they have a secret plan? Will it be patently obvious to most viewers? Washington does good work (and Jodie Foster drops by for a short time), but Lee isn’t quite prepared for this sort of adrenaline-filled cinema. At least he avoids some of the more egregious genre clichés. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Lucky Number Slevin (R, 109 minutes) Scotsman Paul McGuigan (Gangster No. 1) contributes this crazed crime story about a case of mistaken identity that leaves a down-on-his luck slob (Josh Hartnett) stuck in the middle of a gang war between Ben Kingsley and Morgan Freeman (scary). To make matters worse, he’s being pursued by an infamous assassin (Bruce Willis). Our boy Slevin’s situation is slightly ameliorated by the attentions of Lucy Liu, but the body count continues to rise. At times the film becomes wrapped up in its own twisty cleverness—which is wedged somewhere between the filmy smartness of Hitchcock and the showy self-awareness of Tarantino. Still, it’s a hell of zippy ride. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Mission: Impossible III (PG-13, 126 minutes) J.J. Abrams (the guy behind “Alias” and “Lost”) takes over as director for this third outing. Tom Cruise, Ving Rhames, Laurence Fishburne, Keri Russell, Billy Crudup and Philip Seymour Hoffman (doing bad guy duty) make up the impressive cast list. Unfortunately, it’s scripted by the guys who wrote The Island. As in previous Impossible outings, the plot is baroque to the point of nonsensical. The explosions look pretty, though. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

RV (PG) Steve Martin must have been busy, because it’s fallen to Robin Williams to star in this pathetic, plotless excuse for a “family” comedy. Williams stars as a hapless dad who tries to pass off a business trip to Colorado as a family vacation. Along the way, the annoying clan has lots of wacky misadventures in a rented RV. That’s it, folks. Williams was starting to get annoying on screen, now he’s just sad. Go rent National Lampoon’s Vacation instead. It’s pretty much the same movie, only 20 times funnier. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Scary Movie 4 (PG-13) David Zucker (who pioneered this sort of spoofy genre back in 1980 with Airplane!) returns for yet another outing in the Scary Movie franchise. Anna Faris returns as well as the intrepid reporter trying to find out why so many wacky things are happening. There are send-ups of Saw, The Grudge, War of the Worlds, and others too numerous to count. Expect plenty of cameos as well, including a fairly clever sequence involving Shaquille O’Neal and Dr. Phil. The rest revolves around the usual lowbrow sex and potty humor that the kids so dearly love. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Sentinel (PG-13) Kiefer Sutherland, taking time off from his TV gig as a government agent in a frantic race to save the president from assassination, signs on for this theatrical thriller as a government agent in a frantic race to save the president from assassination. Michael Douglas is Sutherland’s foil and former mentor, a disgraced special agent to the White House, who is being framed in the murderous conspiracy (or is he?). Eva Longoria (“Desperate Housewives”) tags along for eye candy. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Silent Hill (R) For those of you who already have BloodRayne and Doom on DVD (or, more likely, PSP), here’s the latest videogame to make the leap to the silver screen. Radha Mitchell (Pitch Black) stars as a woman searching for her sick daughter in the creepy, fog-enshrouded environs of a mysteriously deserted town. (Deserted, of course, except for all the demons, monsters, ghosts and what-have-you.) At least Uwe Boll (Alone in the Dark, House of the Dead, BloodRayne) is not involved. French director Christophe Gans (Brotherhood of the Wolf) lends some polish to the rather predictable goings on. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Stick It (PG-13, 103 minutes) The rather rude title is meant to lead a certain air of attitude to this film’s subject, the world of competitive gymnastics. Seems we’ve got a rebellious teen (“Life As We Know It”’s Missy Peregrym) who gets herself enrolled in an elite gymnastics program run by legendary trainer Jeff Bridges. Naturally, our gal brings some of her street-smart ‘tude to the balance beam, making this the Bring It On of gymnastics movies. Unfortunately, it’s already been brought. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Take the Lead (PG-13, 108 minutes) Antonio Banderas is a ballroom-dance instructor who teaches a group of inner-city rejects how to glide through life’s difficulties in this hip-hop remake of Dangerous Minds. Banderas seems capable of generating heat, but the movie, for some strange reason, clamps a chastity belt on him, focusing instead on those detention students. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Thank You for Smoking (R, 92 minutes) Based on Christopher Buckley’s satiric novel about a tobacco-industry lobbyist (Aaron Eckhart) who seems to feel good about what he does for a living, Jason Reitman’s refreshingly un-PC film lets both sides of the smoking/anti-smoking debate have it with both barrels. Encompassing a trip to Hollywood as well as a kidnapping, the movie gives off a caffeinated buzz, capturing the book’s slightly giddy tone. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

United 93 (R, 90 minutes) Whether people are actually ready to watch dramas about the events of 9/11 remains to be seen. Director Paul Greengrass (The Bourne Supremacy) keeps it pretty close to the vest with this film about the doomed passengers of United flight No. 93 (the ones who provided Bush with his “Let’s roll!” catchphrase). A cast of unknowns dutifully acts out the events of that tragic day in real time, providing not so much dramatic insight as unflinching re-creation. You witnessed it on the news, you relived it in the TV movie Flight 93. Now, you can see it some more. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

V for Vendetta (R, 132 minutes) This adaptation of the cult comic book by Alan Moore and David Lloyd comes to us courtesy of writers/producers the Wachowski brothers. Don’t let the lingering funk of The Matrix Revolutions scare you off, though. This tight, dystopian thriller is a must-see for comic book fans. Hugo Weaving (The Lord of the Rings) plays a mysterious masked figure named V, who seeks to overthrow a totalitarian government in near-future London. Natalie Portman plays the poor waif who gets caught in our anti-hero’s complex plot. The dialogue is, of course, sluggish and ultraphilosophical (it comes courtesy of the Wachowskis, after all), but the plot is timely and the action is adrenalized. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

The Wild (G, 94 minutes) Despite the fact that this computer-animated toon features a group of animals (including a lion and a giraffe) escaping from the New York City Zoo and making a madcap trek to the wilds of Africa, Disney would like to inform you that this is nothing like last year’s Madagascar. Which, of course, it is. The voice cast (including Kiefer Sutherland, Janeane Garofalo, Eddie Izzard and William Shatner) has fun at least, and there are enough fart jokes to keep the kids laughing. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

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1) Don’t call people names or accuse them of things you cannot support.
2) Don’t direct foul language, racial slurs, or offensive terms at other commenters or our staff.
3) Don’t use the discussion on our site for commercial (or shameless personal) promotion.

We reserve the right to remove posts and ban commenters who violate any of the rules listed above, or the spirit of the discussion. We’re trying to create a safe space for a wide range of people to express themselves, and we believe that goal can only be achieved through thoughtful, sensitive editorial control.

If you have questions or comments about our policies or about a specific post, please send an e-mail to editor@c-ville.com.

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