Short film reviews

The Break-Up (PG-13, 106 minutes) Peyton Reed’s “anti-romantic comedy” about a mismatched couple (Vince Vaughn and Jennifer Aniston) is often funny, sometimes uncomfortably so. Vaughn plays a guy’s guy, the kind who’d like to put a pool table in the living room, and Aniston is a version of her sweet, spunky character from “Friends.” (Kent Williams) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Cars (G, 116 minutes) Reviewed on this page. Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Click (PG-13, 86 minutes) Adam Sandler is a harried family man (welcome to the realm of Eddie Murphy and Steve Martin, Mr. Sandler) who finds a magical remote control. Get this: With it, he can pause stuff and fast forward it and mute it. Why he could fast-forward a fight with his wife or slo-mo that jogging girl with the big boobies. My god, that plot is clever enough to be a light beer commercial! (Devin O’Leary) Coming Friday; check local listings

The Da Vinci Code (PG-13, 149 minutes) Ron Howard’s movie version of Dan Brown’s religious-mystery novel, in which a Harvard professor (Tom Hanks) and a Parisian cryptographer (Audrey Tautou) try to track down the Holy Grail while being pursued by a crazed albino monk (Paul Bettany), fails to get a decent spook going, à la The Exorcist or The Omen. Howard has illustrated the book beautifully, but he hasn’t wrestled with it, made it his own. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (PG-13, 104 minutes) Vin Diesel, having long lost any level of relevance to this fast-moving film franchise, is here replaced by Lucas Black, the kid from Sling Blade. But, really, who cares which humans are involved so long as you’ve got a tricked-out Mitsubishi Lancer EVO IX to ogle? Black plays a troubled teen who heads to Tokyo to live with his military uncle officer. There, he falls into the world of underground street racing. The film is rated PG-13 for “reckless and illegal behavior involving teens.” In other words, it’s gonna be a huge hit with high schoolers. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Garfield: A Tale of Two Kitties (PG, 85 minutes) You have no one to blame but yourself for this, people. Garfield goes to England where a case of mistaken cat-identity has him inheriting a castle. There, he runs afoul of the scheming Lord Dargis (played by a no-doubt embarrassed Billy Connolly) who wants the estate all for himself. I realize you spent $75 million on the first movie, America, but I’m confident you regret that now. Think of this as a bad first date you’re embarrassed you slept with. Just avert your eyes as you pass the theater and pretend you can’t see it. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Lake House (PG) Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock (finally! a Speed reunion!) come together again for this romantic mystery, a remake of a beautiful if confusing Korean film. Bullock plays a lonely doctor who begins exchanging letters with a frustrated architect (Reeves). Turns out that Bullock and Reeves are actually living in the same lakeside vacation home, but exist two years apart and are communicating through a magical mailbox. …I told you it was confusing. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Mission: Impossible III (PG-13, 126 minutes) J.J. Abrams (the guy behind “Alias” and “Lost”) takes over as director for this third outing. Tom Cruise, Ving Rhames, Laurence Fishburne, Keri Russell, Billy Crudup and Philip Seymour Hoffman (doing bad guy duty) make up the impressive cast list. Unfortunately, it’s scripted by the guys who wrote The Island. As in previous Impossible outings, the plot is baroque to the point of nonsensical. The explosions look pretty, though. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Nacho Libre (PG) From the makers of Napoleon Dynamite comes this equally odd comedy about a cook (Jack Black) at a Mexican orphanage, who moonlights as a masked wrestler to save his adopted home from foreclosure. The story is simple, and the humor is pretty low key, but Black gives it his all, delivering a surprisingly dexterous performance. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

The Omen (R, 95 minutes) The 1976 shocker The Omen is really just a slasher film dolled up in Biblical raiment. But it’s still a damnably entertaining movie. Naturally, we required no remake; but we’ve got one anyway, once again documenting a clueless Washington family who seems to have given birth to the Antichrist. The cast (including Liev Schreiber, Julia Styles, Mia Farrow and Pete Postlethwaite) takes things seriously, and the direction is notably slick. Still, the script apes the original almost note for note, making this feel like a cover album of your favorite band—good if only for of the familiarity, but not nearly as memorable as the original. (D.O.)
Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Over the Hedge (PG, 96 minutes) An all-star voice cast (Bruce Willis, Garry Shandling, Steve Carell, Wanda Sykes, William Shatner, Nick Nolte) lends its talents to this CGI toon adaptation of the popular newspaper comic strip. Willis plays a mischievous raccoon who helps his forest buddies adapt to the encroaching sprawl of suburbia. The animation is fluid and the writing has a bit more spark than most of the recent computer toons we’ve been subjected to (The Wild). From the director of Antz. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

A Prairie Home Companion (PG-13, 105 minutes) In Robert Altman’s cockeyed salute to Garrison Keillor’s radio program, Keillor (who wrote the script) lumbers on and off the stage of the Fitzgerald Theater, launching into one shaggy-dog story after another. Despite some amusing performances from the likes of Meryl Streep, Lily Tomlin and Kevin Kline, the movie never quite gels, feeling more like a rough draft than a finished work of art. (K.W.) Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre

Waist Deep (R, 97 minutes) In this inner-city thriller, an ex-con (Tyrese Gibson, 2 Fast 2 Furious) gets tangled up with a gang after his car is jacked with his young son inside. When a nasty criminal kingpin (rap star The Game) demands a ransom for the boy’s release, our anti-hero teams up with a street-smart hustler (Meagan Good of You Got Served) for some hip-hop Bonnie and Clyde action. From the director of Glitter. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

X-Men: The Last Stand (PG-13, 104 minutes) The third installment in the Marvel Comics franchise delivers the goods, with moments of sublime pathos and mystic power. With a cure in the offing, society’s untouchables—mutants with superhuman powers—must once again choose between reform or revolution. (K.W.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

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Short film reviews

Akeelah and the Bee (PG, 112 minutes) In case you hadn’t noticed, Hollywood is in the midst of a red-hot spelling bee craze. In the wake of Spellbound and… um, Bee Season, comes this drama about an 11-year-old girl from South Los Angeles who tries to make it to the National Spelling Bee. The story is, as expected, cute and inspirational. It’s also predictable, emotionally simplified and filled with clichés. Think The Karate Kid with a little girl taking over for Ralph Macchio, Laurence Fishburn doing the Mr. Miyagi thing, and words instead of crane kicks to the head. (Devin O’Leary) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Art School Confidential (R, 102 minutes) Focusing on a budding artiste (Max Minghella), Terry Zwigoff’s once-over-lightly satire blows the lid on the academic pursuit of art. Zwigoff is unable to capture the mock-outrage tone of Daniel Clowes’ comic, but the movie still scores points by riding that fine line between art for the ages and utter crap. (Kent Williams) Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre

The Break-Up (PG-13, 106 minutes) Jennifer Aniston and Vince Vaughn (who, yes, are a couple in real life; can we please get over that now?) star as a boyfriend and girlfriend who break up, but refuse to vacate the gorgeous condo they have rebuilt together. On the advice of friends (and a few strangers) the two begin a psychological war, which could be described as the cute version of The War of the Roses. The film doesn’t add any totally unexpected twists to the romantic comedy formula, but Aniston and Vaughn work well together and the humor segues into feel-good territory without ever feeling strained. Kudos for salting the supporting cast with the likes of Ann-Margret, Jason Bateman, Vincent D’Onofrio, Jon Favreau, Peter Billingsley and Joey Lauren Adams. (D.O.) Coming soon; check local lisstings

The Da Vinci Code (PG-13, 149 minutes) Reviewed on this page. Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Just My Luck (PG-13) Lindsay Lohan, backsliding to her lame Disney days, stars in this juvenile romantic comedy about a Manhattan girl with the greatest luck in the world. After a chance encounter with a cute but down-and-out young man (Chris Pine, The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement), she realizes that she’s swapped her fortune for his. From the director of Mystic Pizza, Miss Congeniality and My Favorite Martian. If you’re 14 and female, this will be a very profound movie experience. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Me and You and Everyone We Know (R, 90 minutes) Performance artist Miranda July busts out with an intimate indie film that revels in the details of ordinary life. Writer/director/actor July plays a video artist who falls in love with a recently divorced shoe salesman (John Hawkes from “Deadwood”), father to two young boys. Several other characters and storylines wend their way into the film, giving it an almost ensemble feel. July is a tad too cute and quirky but Hawkes is incredible and the film’s quiet, microscopic observation of life, love, sex and marriage is frequently priceless. A sure bet for fans of the oddly wonderful and the wonderfully odd. (D.O.) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater

Mission: Impossible III (PG-13, 126 minutes) J.J. Abrams (the guy behind “Alias” and “Lost”) takes over as director for this third outing. Tom Cruise, Ving Rhames, Laurence Fishburne, Keri Russell, Billy Crudup and Philip Seymour Hoffman (doing bad guy duty) make up the impressive cast list. Unfortunately, it’s scripted by the guys who wrote The Island. As in previous Impossible outings, the plot is baroque to the point of nonsensical. The explosions look pretty, though. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Over the Hedge (PG, 96 minutes) An all-star voice cast (Bruce Willis, Garry Shandling, Steve Carell, Wanda Sykes, William Shatner, Nick Nolte) lends its talents to this CGI toon adaptation of the popular newspaper comic strip. Willis plays a mischievous raccoon who helps his forest buddies adapt to the encroaching sprawl of suburbia. The animation is fluid and the writing has a bit more spark than most of the recent computer toons we’ve been subjected to (The Wild). From the director of Antz. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Poseidon (PG-13, 98 minutes) Kurt Russell, Josh Lucas and Richard Dreyfuss star in a big-budget remake of 1972 shipwreck movie The Poseidon Adventure, combining our fear of drowning with our fear of tight spaces. Director Wolfgang Petersen’s in too much of a hurry, keeping all the deaths at a distance. (K.W.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Promise (PG-13, 102 minutes) Director Chen Kaige (Temptress Moon, The Emperor and the Assassin) shapes this Hero-like historical fantasy, the most expensive film ever produced in China. The Asian all-star vehicle features Cecelia Chung (Shaolin Soccer) as a young girl who makes a deal with a goddess: In exchange for unparalleled wealth and beauty, she must lose every man she will ever love. Among the men whose path she crosses are a handsome slave (Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War’s Jang Dong-kun), a villainous invader (Nicolas Tse, Gen-X Cops) and a steadfast general (Hiroyuki Sanada, The White Countess). The poorly edited story is hard to keep track of and the wealth of digital effects are too cheap (by American standards) to feel particularly immersive. It looks real pretty, though. In Mandarin with English subtitles. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall Cinema 6

Rent (PG-13, 128 minutes) The Pulitzer and Tony Award-winning Broadway musical (basically La Boheme rezoned for New York’s East Village) comes to the big screen with all the singing, dancing and AIDS intact. Rosario Dawson and Taye Diggs headline the cast. Chris Columbus (Home Alone) directs the resolutely anti-establishment musical with a fairly mainstream hand. But everybody sings well. (D.O.) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater

RV (PG, 98 minutes) Steve Martin must have been busy, because it’s fallen to Robin Williams to star in this pathetic, plotless excuse for a “family” comedy. Williams stars as a
hapless dad who tries to pass off a business trip to Colorado as a family vacation. Along
the way, the annoying clan has lots of wacky misadventures in a rented RV. That’s it, folks. Williams was starting to get annoying on screen, now he’s just sad. Go rent National Lampoon’s Vacation instead. It’s pretty much the same movie, only 20 times funnier. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

See No Evil (R, 84 minutes) Porn king Gregory Dark (New Wave Hookers, Let Me Tell Ya ’Bout White Chicks) tries his hand at directing a mainstream horror film. Naturally, he hooks up with professional wrestler Kane (who used to grapple under the name Dr. Isaac Yankem DDS). The story (such as it is) concerns a group of troubled teens (nobody you’ve ever heard of) who are assigned to clean up an old hotel. Wouldn’t you know it: There’s a serial killer living there. It’s produced by World Wrestling Entertainment Films. My work here is done. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Stick It (PG-13, 103 minutes) The rather rude title is meant to lead a certain air of attitude to this film’s subject, the world of competitive gymnastics. Seems we’ve got a rebellious teen (“Life As We Know It”’s Missy Peregrym) who gets herself enrolled in an elite gymnastics program run by legendary trainer Jeff Bridges. Naturally, our gal brings some of her street-smart ’tude to the balance beam, making this the Bring It On of gymnastics movies. Unfortunately, it’s already been brought. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Thank You for Smoking (R, 92 minutes) Based on Christopher Buckley’s satiric novel about a tobacco-industry lobbyist (Aaron Eckhart) who seems to feel good about what he does for a living, Jason Reitman’s refreshingly un-PC film lets both sides of the smoking/anti-smoking debate have it with both barrels. Encompassing a trip to Hollywood as well as a kidnapping, the movie gives off a caffeinated buzz, capturing the book’s slightly giddy tone. (K.W.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

United 93 (R, 90 minutes) Whether people are actually ready to watch dramas about the events of 9/11 remains to be seen. Director Paul Greengrass (The Bourne Supremacy) keeps it pretty close to the vest with this film about the doomed passengers of United flight No. 93 (the ones who provided Bush with his “Let’s roll!” catchphrase). A cast of unknowns dutifully acts out the events of that tragic day in real time, providing not so much dramatic insight as unflinching recreation. You witnessed it on the news, you relived it in the TV movie “Flight 93”. Now, you can see it some more. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Why We Fight (PG-13, 98 minutes) Fifty years after President Eisenhower brought up something called the military-industrial complex in his Farewell Address, we’ve become the military state he warned us about. Or so Eugene Jarecki would have us believe in this collage-barrage of images and ideas, a history lesson that doubles as a damning indictment of our plowshares-into-swords orientation. (K.W.) Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre

X-Men: The Last Stand (PG-13, 104 minutes) Bryan Singer defected to the DC Universe to direct this summer’s Superman Returns, hands the reins over to Brett Ratner (Rush Hour) for this third mutant-minded offering. Seems that a “cure” has been found to treat mutantkind. Naturally, that news doesn’t sit too well with good-guy mutant leader Professor X (Patrick Stewart) or bad-guy mutant leader Magneto (Ian McKellan). You can also add Beast (Kelsey Grammer) and Angel (Ben Foster) to the mutant mix this time around. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

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Short film reviews

American Dreamz (PG-13, 107 minutes) Paul Weitz (American Pie, About a Boy, In Good Company) delivers this ripe parody of American politics and pop culture. Seems that an unpopular American President (Dennis Quaid) wants a bit of publicity, so he signs on to appear as guest judge for a mega-popular, “American Idol”-style singing contest. Little does he know that Muslim terrorists have seeded the show with a singing suicide bomber. The humor is broad and cartoonish, but Hugh Grant does strike a chord as the show’s mean-spirited host. (Devin O’Leary) Coming Friday; check local listings

ATL (PG-13, 105 minutes) Four friends prepare for life after high school, each taking a different life path in this rap-fueled inner city drama/comedy. Cast includes assorted rappers-turned-actors like Big Boi, Bone Crusher and Jazze Pha. ATL stands for Atlanta, by the way. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

The Benchwarmers (PG-13, 80 minutes) A trio of dorky dudes (David Spade, Rob Schneider and Napoleon Dynamite’s Jon Heder) try to make up for their pathetic childhoods by forming a three-man baseball team to compete against standard Little League teams. This one’s only funny if you like the lamest of output from Adam Sandler’s drinking buddies. (It’s written by Alan Covert, who gave us the glory of Grandma’s Boy.) (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (PG, 140 minutes) C.S. Lewis’ Christian-Lite parable about four children who travel through a magical wardrobe cabinet to a fantasy land caught in a war between an evil witch and a messianic lion goes live-action (mostly). The film relies a bit heavily on the CG effects, not all of which are entirely convincing. (The film has a too clean, too manufactured look about it.) Director Andrew Adamson (Shrek, Shrek 2) doesn’t quite have Peter  Jackson’s (Lord of the Rings) skill with this sort of material. As a result, the film reads like a juvenile version of Return of the King. Still, kids will probably surrender to the film’s seductive aura of magic and wonderment. (D.O.) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater

Duma (PG, 100 minutes) A young South African boy befriends an orphaned cheetah cub in this harmless, live-action flick inspired by Disney’s old true-life adventure tales. The animals are more interesting than the people, ultimately. Think The Yearling, but with fangs. From the director of Fly Away Home. (D.O.) Playing at Vinegar Hill Theatre    

Failure to Launch (PG-13, 97 minutes) Matthew McConaughey plays a 30something slacker dude who refuses to move out of his parents’ house. Naturally, Mom and Dad hire a freelance relationship interventionist (a what?) played by Sarah Jessica Parker. See, she tricks men into falling in love with her, so they’ll grow up and move out of their parents’ houses. Then she dumps them. (Where exactly was this career field on high school job day?) Of course, since this is a romantic comedy, our girl actually falls for our guy. Now, all we have to do is wait around for the reveal of the Big Lie, followed by the inevitable Bad Breakup, trailed shortly by the Tearful Public Reunion. Too bad the film’s charismatic stars are wedded to such a generic romcom script. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6   
Ice Age: The Meltdown (PG, 90 minutes) Gee, that was a pretty short ice age. Seems that the Earth is now warming back up again, and our heroes, the mastodon, the saber-toothed tiger, the sloth and the squirrel thing, must find a new home to live in. Queen Latifah, Jay Leno and Seann William Scott add their voices to the cast this time around. If your kids were entertained by the first one, they’ll be entertained by this one. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

Inside Man (R, 129 minutes) Spike Lee tries his hand at a more mainstream thriller with this intermittently successful heist drama. A gang of bank robbers led by Clive Owen takes over a bank in Manhattan. Hostage negotiator Denzel Washington is called in to handle the situation. Naturally, there are lots of twists and turns along the way as the bank robbers scheme to get out with the dough. Do they have a secret plan? Will it be patently obvious to most viewers? Washington does good work (and Jodie Foster drops by for a short time), but Lee isn’t quite prepared for this sort of adrenaline-filled cinema. At least he avoids some of the more egregious genre clichés. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Larry the Cable Guy: Health Inspector (PG-13, 90 minutes) So…um…I’m trying to work this out. He’s Larry the Cable Guy, but he’s a health inspector. Why didn’t they just make him a cable guy? O.K., clearly I’m overthinking this. Here we have redneck comedian (or “blue-collar comedian” if you prefer) Larry the Cable Guy in his first feature film. If you think Larry’s catchphrase “git-r-done” is hilarious, you’ll probably bust a gut at this film’s fine selection of fart and poop jokes. Still, it would be a lot funnier sitting at home on the couch with a six-pack of Stroh’s. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Lucky Number Slevin (R, 109 minutes) Scotsman Paul McGuigan (Gangster No. 1) contributes this crazed crime story about a case of mistaken identity that leaves a down-on-his luck slob (Josh Hartnett) stuck in the middle of a gang war between Ben Kingsley and Morgan Freeman (scary). To make matters worse, he’s being pursued by an infamous assassin (Bruce Willis). Our boy Slevin’s situation is slightly ameliorated by the attentions of Lucy Liu, but the body count continues to rise. At times the film becomes wrapped up in its own twisty cleverness—which is wedged somewhere between the filmy smartness of Hitchcock and the showy self-awareness of Tarantino. Still, it’s a hell of zippy ride. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Phat Girlz (PG-13, 100 minutes) It’s got a “ph” and a “z” in the title, so you know you’re in for some wacky fun. Mo’Nique (“Moesha”) stars as an aspiring plus-size fashion designer struggling to find love and acceptance. Her dreams get a bit closer when she meets a handsome African gentleman who comes from a culture that reveres women of size. Come prepared for lots and lots of “full-bodied lady” jokes. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Scary Movie 4 (PG-13) David Zucker (who pioneered this sort of spoofy genre back in 1980 with Airplane!) returns for yet another outing in the Scary Movie franchise. Anna Faris returns as well as the intrepid reporter trying to find out why so many wacky things are happening. There are send-ups of Saw, The Grudge, War of the Worlds, and others too numerous to count. Expect plenty of cameos as well, including a fairly clever sequence involving Shaquille O’Neal and Dr. Phil. The rest revolves around the usual lowbrow sex and potty humor that the kids so dearly love. (D.O.) Playing at Carmike Cinema 6

The Sentinel (PG-13) Kiefer Sutherland, taking time off from his TV gig as a government agent in a frantic race to save the president from assassination, signs on for this theatrical thriller as a government agent in a frantic race to save the president from assassination. Michael Douglas is Sutherland’s foil and former mentor, a disgraced special agent to the White House, who is being framed in the murderous conspiracy (or is he?). Eva Longoria (“Desperate Housewives”) tags along for eye candy. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

She’s the Man (PG-13, 105 minutes) Although it’s based loosely on Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, this teen romcom probably owes more to the immortal ’80s comedy Just One of the Guys (what, you didn’t have Showtime in 1986?). Amanda Bynes (from Nickelodeon’s “The Amanda Show”) stars as a teen who dreams of plaing soccer. Naturally, when her brother heads off to London for a couple of weeks, she disguises herself as him and starts attending his elite prep school dressed in drag. Over the course of this preposterous charade, she falls in love with one of her teammates, setting off a series of hopelessly tangled love affairs. (Seriously, rent Just One of the Guys from Netflix. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

Silent Hill (R) For those of you who already have BloodRayne and Doom on DVD (or, more likely, PSP), here’s the latest videogame to make the leap to the silver screen. Radha Mitchell (Pitch Black) stars as a woman searching for her sick daughter in the creepy, fog-enshrouded environs of a mysteriously deserted town. (Deserted, of course, except for all the demons, monsters, ghosts and what-have-you.) At least Uwe Boll (Alone in the Dark, House of the Dead, BloodRayne) is not involved. French director Christophe Gans (Brotherhood of the Wolf) lends some polish to the rather predictable goings on. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

Stick It (PG-13, 105 minutes) The rather rude title is meant to lead
a certain air of attitude to this film’s subject, the world of competitive gymnastics. Seems we’ve got a rebellious teen (“Life As We Know It”’s Missy Peregrym) who gets herself enrolled in an elite gymnastics program run by legendary trainer Jeff Bridges. Naturally, our gal brings some of her street-smart ’tude to the balance beam, making this the Bring It On of gymnastics movies. Unfortunately, it’s already been brought. (D.O.) Coming Friday; check local listings

Take the Lead (PG-13, 108 minutes) Reviewed on page 48. Playing at Carmike Cinema 6
Thank You For Smoking (R, 92 minutes) Reviewed on page 48. Playing at Regal Downtown Mall 6

V for Vendetta (R, 132 minutes) This adaptation of the cult comic book by Alan Moore and David Lloyd comes to us courtesy of writers/producers the Wachowski brothers. Don’t let the lingering funk of The Matrix Revolutions scare you off, though. This tight, dystopian thriller is a must-see for comic book fans. Hugo Weaving (The Lord of the Rings) plays a mysterious masked figure named V, who seeks to overthrow a totalitarian government in near-future London. Natalie Portman plays the poor waif who gets caught in our anti-hero’s complex plot. The dialogue is, of course, sluggish and ultraphilosophical (it comes courtesy of the Wachowskis, after all), but the plot is timely and the action is adrenalized. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Seminole Square Cinema 4

Walk the Line (PG-13, 136 minutes) Joaquin Phoenix gives everything he can to the role of country music legend Johnny Cash, even going so far as to sing his own tunes. Oscar winner Reese Witherspoon follows close behind as Cash’s longtime love June Carter. The romantic/contentious relationship between Cash and Carter is effectively the highlight of the film and plays off some good chemistry between Phoenix and Witherspoon. At the end of the day, though, the film is a conventional biopic that takes a bit too much mystery out of one of music’s darkest outlaws. (D.O.) Playing through Thursday at Jefferson Theater

The Wild (G, 94 minutes) Despite the fact that this computer-animated toon features a group of animals (including a lion and a giraffe) escaping from the New York City Zoo and making a madcap trek to the wilds of Africa, Disney would like to inform you that this is nothing like last year’s Madagascar. Which, of course, it is. The voice cast (including Kiefer Sutherland, Janeane Garofalo, Eddie Izzard and William Shatner) has fun at least, and there are enough fart jokes to keep the kids laughing. (D.O.) Playing at Regal Semionole Square Cinema 4

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