Will George Huguely’s trial be further delayed?

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Sharon Love’s attorney asked November 2 to continue her March 2017 civil trial against George Huguely, convicted in 2012 with second-degree murder in the death of her daughter, Yeardley Love, to a later date. UPI/Kevin Dietsch Sharon Love’s attorney asked November 2 to continue her March 2017 civil trial against George Huguely, convicted in 2012 with second-degree murder in the death of her daughter, Yeardley Love, to a later date. UPI/Kevin Dietsch

Attorneys for former UVA student George Huguely and Sharon Love, the mother of the woman he was charged with killing in 2010, met November 2 in Charlottesville Circuit Court for a motions hearing in which Love’s attorney asked the court to continue her March 2017 civil trial against Huguely to a later date—though the same motion was denied 15 days prior.

Two months after Huguely’s February 2012 second-degree murder conviction in the death of Yeardley Love, his on- and off-again girlfriend, her mother filed a $30 million wrongful death civil lawsuit.

Love also has an interest in a federal case in Maryland between Huguely’s mother and stepfather and their insurance company, Chartis Property Casualty Company, which is balking at covering the convicted murderer for $6 million. That money could potentially be used to pay Love, though the company’s policy has a criminal exclusion that may not cover Huguely if it is deemed that he intentionally killed Yeardley.

In that case—and amid Love’s wrongful death suit against Huguely—she filed a brief in June stating that he didn’t mean to kill her daughter. Distraught over Yeardley breaking up with him, Love said he went to her apartment and had “an emotional conversation,” during which Yeardley banged her own head against the wall, later resulting in her death.

“Of course, money is always a poor substitute for the loss of a loved one,” Love’s attorney, Richmond-based
Jeffrey Stedman, said in court, but in this case, he said, it’s the “only remedy.” He asked Judge Richard Moore to continue Huguely’s 2017 trial until the case in Maryland can be resolved.

Love’s civil trial is anticipated to take three weeks. Moore said the next three-week slot available is in July 2018, which is eight years after Yeardley’s death.

“It’s been long enough,” rebutted attorney Matthew Green, who represents Huguely. He thanked Stedman for reminding the judge that this case is “all about the money,” and added, “at some point, this should be about justice and the truth.”

But Love’s counsel says time isn’t of the essence.

“If it’s eight years versus 87 years, I just don’t see where it’s going to make any difference,” Stedman said.

Judge Moore said he is inclined to deny the motion and would be in touch with both attorneys with his final decision by the end of the month.

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