Charlottesville Obama tickets available through Tuesday

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A line stretched from the local Obama campaign office on the Downtown Mall up to Market Street Sunday as supporters waited to claim free tickets to a Wednesday campaign event. Photo: Graelyn Brashear. A line stretched from the local Obama campaign office on the Downtown Mall up to Market Street Sunday as supporters waited to claim free tickets to a Wednesday campaign event. Photo: Graelyn Brashear.

Hundreds lined up outside local Obama for America offices Sunday for free passes to the President’s Wednesday campaign appearance in Charlottesville, and despite the enthusiastic showing, tickets to the event at the nTelos Wireless Pavilion are still available.

The campaign will distribute tickets between noon and 8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday at the following locations

Downtown Charlottesville Field Office
407 E Main Street
Charlottesville

The Corner
1325 West Main St.

Albemarle Field Office
335 Greenbrier Drive, Suite 206
CharlottesvilleOFA-VA Fluvanna Field Office
#110 265 Turkeysag Trail
Palmyra, Fluvanna County
Luretha Dixon and her husband Ralph arrived Downtown at about 10 a.m. Sunday—two hours before the campaign office planned to start handing out the tickets. Both said they’ve been strong supporters of the President since his first campaign, and are eager for another Democratic victory in Virginia.”I like someone who sticks to his guns,” Ralph Dixon said. And Obama’s delivered what he promised: an end to the Iraq war, and a health care plan that could help a lot of people
Not everyone who showed up Sunday was from solidly blue Charlottesville. Jeremy Rose and his wife and son drove almost five hours from their Wise County home to be among the first in line for tickets. Rose, a former Republican, said it’s not something he would have done four years ago. But times have changed. The mine pump factory worker was laid off when the economy tanked, and he doesn’t trust his old party to get things right again.”
Obama inherited this,” Rose said, just as volunteers brought out stacks of tickets to start distributing them. “It’s not his fault it was spiraling out of control. Hopefully things will turn around.”
Rose’s son Andrew Hamilton, 17, isn’t going to be old enough to vote come November, but he was the one who pushed his family to come to Charlottesville twice in one week for the chance to see the President—and did most of the driving.”It’s a once in a lifetime thing,” Hamilton said. “And I believe in what he says.”
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