Nell Boeschenstein



Funding cuts could affect local gang programs

Apparently the Bush Administration’s much- touted law-and-order focus doesn’t extend to actually paying for anything. Like, for example, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention programs. In his latest budget request for Fiscal Year 2007, Bush proposed to cut such federal programs 43 percent, to $176 million from $308.7 million.

From the department of shameless self-promotion

In case you hadn\’t noticed, C-VILLE Weekly has a new website. And yes, folks, we are very, very proud of it. I know that in the past I\’ve given other unsuspecting sites grief about their poor design or oversights in the useful information department (charlottesville.org 1.0, I\’m looking at you) when, all the while, my home team website left a lot to be desired. However, while I\’ve been known to bite the hand that feeds me on occasion, in this case I somehow managed to keep my choppers to myself.

What’s in the pipeline for Scottsville

What’s in the pipeline for Scottsville

Scottsville, 20 minutes south of Charlottesville on Route 20, is known for its small-town charm. But that doesn’t mean the development craze that has been hitting Albemarle and the surrounding counties hasn’t had any effect on this town of 600 residents. According to Mayor Steve Phipps, the biggest issue facing his town right now is traffic, specifically from the rapidly growing counties of Fluvanna and Buckingham.

A change is gonna come

A change is gonna come

Six months ago, in our “2006 Development Forecast,” C-VILLE reported not on how Charlottesville and Albemarle have already changed, but on how our home was going to change. Hours spent adding up rows and rows of numbers from the City and County’s planning offices yielded startling totals: a potential for 18,725 new residential units and 6,235,451 more square feet of commercial space on the way in the next decade or so.

Judge dismisses case against “Living Wage” Protesters

Judge dismisses case against “Living Wage” Protesters

The 17 students who took over UVA\’s Madison Hall for four days in April are off the hook on their trespassing charges. On Monday, May 23, Judge Robert Downer in Charlottesville General District Court dismissed the charges against all the students. He said that because UVA Chief Financial Officer Leonard Sandridge had told the students that they had five minutes to vacate the building, and yet UVA police began arresting students before that five minutes was up, that the case had to be dismissed on lack of grounds. The judge also said that the University had been sending mixed messages to the students, by agreeing to have a dialogue with them, then having them arrested.

Would-be Teen bomber gets out

Would-be Teen bomber gets out

The 15-year-old Albemarle County High School student found guilty of plotting with three other teens to use explosives on two area high schools has been allowed by an Albemarle County Circuit Court judge to return home to his family. Reached for comment, neither the teen\’s mother, nor his lawyer, David Bruns, would comment on why the court decided that the 15-year-old could—or should—go home, because the case remains closed to the public. The teen\’s mother did say that her son is home permanently, and that she and her husband have plans to home-school him. She says that he needs to catch up on the last quarter of 10th grade since he\’s fallen behind due to his legal woes. He will have the summer off and then, his mother says, will continue his 11th grade studies at home in the fall. She also says that, “He\’s doing great. He\’s doing very well,” and that both she and her husband are pleased with the outcome.

www.charlottesville.org

Yes, Charlottesville there is a god. How do I know? I know because the City of Charlottesville finally has (drum roll, please!) a new website. I know, I know: You don\’t believe me. You\’re rubbing your eyes as if what you read could not possibly be true. Your mouth is hanging open in disbelief. You\’re rethinking long-held beliefs about the existence of Santa Claus. And yet? It\’s true, I tell you: TRUE!

Bryant found guilty in RICO trial

Bryant found guilty in RICO trial

After two weeks of testimony in federal court, a jury came back with a guilty verdict for Louis Antonio Bryant on Monday morning, May 22. The ringleader of the Charlottesville gang the Westside Crew, otherwise known as Project Crud, was found guilty of racketeering and one count of attempted murder. He faces life in prison.

Students urge divestment from Darfur

Students urge divestment from Darfur

It’s always nice to have at least some idea where the money is going. Or, in the case of most UVA students, where their parents’ money is going. Lately, this has proven to be the source of some concern to a group of UVA students who don’t want to see any of their families’ money invested in companies that do business in Sudan, or with the Sudanese government.

Jeremy Harvey returns to town

Jeremy Harvey returns to town

In February, Jeremy Harvey left Charlottesville on the midnight train to Las Vegas. The shady local banker (and past C-VILLE cover boy) left his girlfriend and her children to remarry his ex-wife, 81-year-old newspaper heiress Betty Scripps. Now, however, it appears that Harvey, 62, has left Scripps after just three months. According to multiple sources familiar with his status, Harvey is back in town and living in his Colthurst mini-mansion with the girlfriend he demurred for Scripps. Scripps and Harvey were married for the first time from 1997 to 2004.

The Bloods are here, so what?

Now that Charlottesville police have confirmed that an attack near Friendship Court in late April, which left one teen so badly beaten he had to get two metal plates inserted into his face, was the work of the Bloods street gang, Charlottesville is left wondering how and why the Bloods came to town. For a little perspective on who the Bloods are and how they operate, C-VILLE called national gang expert and consultant Robert Walker with the organization Gangs Or Us. Here’s some of what he had to say.—Nell Boeschenstein

Kroboth attorney calls sentence excessive

An attorney for Kurt Kroboth, the former investment banker accused of donning a vampire mask and attempting to murder his estranged wife back in November 2004, has filed a motion calling into question the constitutionality of the sentence his client was handed on May 9. Judge William Shelton sentenced Kroboth to 25 years for attempted murder, with all but 10 years suspended. The defense had recommended a sentence of two and a half to five years; the prosecution recommended four and a half to eight years.

Cook gets nine months for resisting arrest

Cook gets nine months for resisting arrest

Faced with a life-changing experience, people can change. That was the central argument of Kerry Cook's defense attorney during a three-day trial that unfolded in Charlottesville Circuit Court last week. On May 11, the jury sentenced Cook to nine months in prison for resisting arrest during a domestic dispute at Friendship Court back in August 2004. The fight ended when one of the cops shot Cook in the stomach, leaving him near death and in a coma for three weeks. Cook faced two other assault charges in the incident, but the jurors could not reach a decision on those charges. Cook, who has been in jail for 21 months on separate charges, will now serve another nine.

VQR Snags two national mag awards

On May 9, The Virginia Quarterly Review—a four-man publishing operation run out of the University of Virginia—won two National Magazine Awards, the industry\’s highest honor. VQR won for General Excellence in the under 100,000 distribution category, as well as for fiction, a category in which they were pitted against such tough competitors as The Atlantic Monthly and McSweeney\’s.

RICO retrial enters second week

The federal drug and conspiracy case against Louis Antonio Bryant, the alleged drug dealer and ringleader of local gang the Westside Crew, continues into its second week of testimony on Monday, May 15. The first week prosecutors brought to the stand numerous police investigators, as well as former associates of Bryant\’s who had dealt with or bought drugs from him.

City seeks land payback

When 180 acres are flooded to make way for the long-planned Ragged Mountain Reservoir expansion, the city will lose acres of public hiking trails. City Councilor Kevin Lynch wants replacement public land, but finding a location could prove tricky.

Fifth Street church burns. Was it arson?

Fifth Street church burns. Was it arson?

At about 11pm on Thursday, May 4, Bishop Rufus Hayes of the Charlottesville Church of Christ was awakened to a telephone call telling him that his church was burning.
By the time he arrived at the church he’s led for 17 years, flames had engulfed the Fifth Street building’s smaller sanctuary and offices, and firefighters were working to keep the main sanctuary from succumbing to the fire.

dems sweep City council election

dems sweep City council election

The white board at the front of the room announced the outcomes from the individual precincts: Democratic candidate for City Council Dave Norris won seven of Charlottesville’s eight precincts and took home 3,835 votes; his running mate, former fire chief Julian Taliaferro, won 3,637. Republican incumbent Rob Schilling came in dead last with 2,389. Given that the Dems’ campaign made the election all about Schilling, the Dems’ victory party at the Charlottesville Ice Park was predictably raucous: booze flowed, Beyoncé blared, Norris even spilled his beer on an unsuspecting reveler.

Local immigrants join in national day of demonstrations

Local immigrants join in national day of demonstrations

Waving American flags, singing hymns in Spanish and English, and holding signs that declared “We struggle for what is right with dignity” and “I am an immigrant, not a delinquent,” about 350 local Hispanics and community members gathered outside the County Office Building on McIntire Road at 6:30pm on May 1 to tell Charlottesville loud and clear: “We\’re here, and we matter.”

Crawford Case Delayed

Crawford Case Delayed

The trial of Dale Anthony Crawford, a former Manassas car salesman, was scheduled to start May 1. However, a last-minute crisis will leave Crawford awaiting trial a little longer. Crawford’s defense attorney Liz Murtagh was diagnosed with a serious illness April 26; the trial will be rescheduled next week once Murtagh knows the course of her treatment.

And now, a classic Internet tendency

As I was looking back and reminiscing on the websites I\’ve pushed on people in the year since I began professionally pushing websites, I was shocked and appalled to realize that while I\’ve waxed poetic about some of the most random websites that the wacky World Wide Web has to offer, I\’ve neglected to praise some of the most obvious.

Capshaw to buy Jefferson Theater

A change can do a body good. And a refreshing change is what Hawes Spencer hopes will come to the mixed-use Jefferson Theater building, the Downtown stalwart and second-run movie palace, now that he is selling it to local megadeveloper Coran Capshaw.