Giles Morris

Giles Morris grew up the son of a Washington D.C. journalist and a Congressional press secretary and claims to be a fifth generation newsman on his father's side, which is hard to get your head around, but means effectively that working with words is in the blood. Prior to taking the editor-in-chief job at C-VILLE Weekly in July 2011, he learned his trade putting in shifts at the Rhinelander Daily News, the Smoky Mountain News, and the Tuckasegee Reader, an online newspaper he co-founded. Giles has also spent time as a high school English teacher on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota and as a community organizer in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood and managed to pick up a masters degree from Harvard Divinity School along the way. His many interests include the great outdoors, jogo bonito, American literature, and whooping it up (occasionally).

Editor's Note: All politics is local

I knew a political operative in Chicago, since moved on to D.C., who used to get upset by the way people misunderstood and then misused O’Neill’s analect. For this guy, the advice wasn’t a warning to limit the scope of campaign messages, it was a simple reminder that to win elections, you have to start with a base at home and build out from there.

Editor's Note: A Thanksgiving message

This Thanksgiving, don’t forget to say thanks. No, really. Because with the planes, trains, and automobiles on Wednesday, the turkey and football on Thursday, and the dawn frenzy of Black Friday, it may be hard to get a quiet minute, much less make the connection that we are celebrating the bounty of the American continent.

Editor's note: War is expensive

This week’s feature is about Vaughan Wilson, a veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom, our war in Afghanistan, which is 10 years old this month. It’s also about the fact that a decade of war has created a generation of men and women directly affected by its costs and that, as a country, we’re really only just beginning to learn what that means.

Editor's Note: October 18

Food is the most direct connection between necessity and art in culture. Whether you are an Oglala who prizes a salted slice of raw kidney from a fresh kill, a Basque with a taste for reconstituted salt cod in pil pil sauce, or a Virginian with specific thoughts about Surry County ham, our cuisines show how we adapt and ultimately exalt the foods that keep us alive, and in the process create a shared identity.

UVA soccer star Will Bates has Hoos rolling

UVA soccer star Will Bates has Hoos rolling

Will Bates didn’t grow up with soccer in his blood. Born in Chester, Virginia, in football country and raised by a father who had been a gridiron warrior at Virginia Military Institute, his success story is a classic example of the expansion of the sport in this country and of a homegrown talent’s route to the big stage

10.04.11

Growing up, we sang the Johnny Appleseed song before dinner. I don’t know where the tradition came from in our house. Since my mother was Catholic, I’d guess it came from my father’s side. Not that it makes a whole lot more sense theologically for Alabama Presbyterians to be singing a Swedenborgian anthem, but the hymn […]

Perspectives on 9/11

Perspectives on 9/11

Around the country this past Sunday, communities big and small held events to commemorate the 10th anniversary of 9/11 and to honor the nearly 3,000 people who died as a result of the Al Qaeda

Head of the Class

Head of the Class

During a press conference last week, UVA President Teresa Sullivan introduced the school’s newest recruits to the public. Of the 3,450 first year students, 67 percent come from Virginia, 91 percent were in the top 10 percent of their high school classes, and they averaged 1,339 on their SATs.    UVA President Teresa Sullivan “This […]