Giles Morris

Giles Morris grew up the son of a Washington D.C. journalist and a Congressional press secretary and claims to be a fifth generation newsman on his father's side, which is hard to get your head around, but means effectively that working with words is in the blood. Prior to taking the editor-in-chief job at C-VILLE Weekly in July 2011, he learned his trade putting in shifts at the Rhinelander Daily News, the Smoky Mountain News, and the Tuckasegee Reader, an online newspaper he co-founded. Giles has also spent time as a high school English teacher on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota and as a community organizer in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood and managed to pick up a masters degree from Harvard Divinity School along the way. His many interests include the great outdoors, jogo bonito, American literature, and whooping it up (occasionally).

Carl Anderson. Photo: John Robinson.

Editor’s Note: Make art, not money

There aren’t many things you can’t learn in school. You can learn to be a poet or a cake baker, a philosopher or an engineer, a composer or a chemist, a carpenter or a priest. But, in spite of Jack Black’s best efforts, you can’t learn to be a rock star. There’s irony, I think, […]

Editor’s Note: Job satisfaction and the economy

Editor’s Note: Job satisfaction and the economy

The Dow Jones broke records and the unemployment rate found its way to a five-year low last week. Look around and you can tell the construction industry is perking up. Roofs are coming off and going back on all over town. Site prep is moving forward on some major development projects. “Under contract” signs are […]

Editor’s Note: Pay your teachers

Editor’s Note: Pay your teachers

Target fixation is a term I learned riding a motorcycle, but it’s become a useful teaching metaphor. The lesson is basically to look where you want to go, not where you’re afraid of going. I learned my lesson when I almost hit a curb and catapulted into the Delaware River after trying to avoid a […]

Editor’s Note: Race in the post-racial America

Editor’s Note: Race in the post-racial America

This past Saturday at the Savannah Book Festival, I listened to Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Leonard Pitts Jr. talk about his new book Freeman, the story of a freed slave tracking down his wife after the Civil War. During the Q&A, in an auditorium mostly filled with middle-aged white women, the conversation turned to the subject […]

Editor’s Note: Love is all you need

Editor’s Note: Love is all you need

I watched the Grammys last night. Well, I watched the first hour of it anyway, which is about all I could manage. I’ve been interviewing singer-songwriters recently and have been thinking a lot about the chances they have at success in today’s music industry. There was Taylor Swift, the child bride of Nashville, former teen […]

Editor’s Note: A word on the American dream

Editor’s Note: A word on the American dream

“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” So go the familiar lines of “The New Colossus,” a parochial sonnet that found its way inside the Statue of […]

Editor’s Note: On health, mental and physical

Editor’s Note: On health, mental and physical

It is common sense. The body affects the mind; the mind affects the body. But medical science is not a field built on instinct or conjecture, and the variables that need to be isolated in order to support even the simplest causal relationships between mental and physical health are daunting. Time, perhaps, to treat the […]

Grandmaster Wang Fu-lai makes notes during an interview. Photo: John Robinson.

Editor’s Note: The Tao of city planning

Last week one of our online contributors, Jim Duncan, predicted that 2013 will be the year the real estate market turns. Jim is a Realtor with Nest Realty, so he’s not exactly a dispassionate observer, but market indicators around the country and locally are supporting his claim. Prices, at least in the residential market, are […]

Guinevere Higgins wants to help you grow food in your backyard

Guinevere Higgins wants to help you grow food in your backyard

It’s a few days before the winter solstice and the temperature is 55 degrees. Guinevere Higgins—founding board member of City Schoolyard Garden and co-founder of Blue Ridge Backyard Harvest—stares down at an arugula patch that’s been flattened by Fern, one of her two dogs. “I think they actually like to nibble on it,” she says. […]

Corporal Michael Joseph "Dutch" Dutcher, killed in action September 15, 2011 in Helman Province, Afghanistan. Photo: Elliott Woods

Editor’s Note: War and the culture of violence

As we make final preparations for the holidays, 68,000 U.S. troops are still in Afghanistan. On Christmas Day, some might get a decent meal and a little booze at a base where they can Facebook relatives; others will be stuck in inhospitable outposts littering the remote countryside. They’ll wake up, in the morning or evening, […]

Editor’s Note: Hunger is a powerful metaphor

Editor’s Note: Hunger is a powerful metaphor

Americans are hungry. We work more hours per week than our counterparts in Europe and we eat more, too. Charlottesville has over 370 restaurants and a grocery store for every palate. We have no staple food, culturally; the cornucopia is our defining principle. Stay hungry out there, a pee wee football coach might say. Eat […]

Downtown Busk Break: Les Grosses Erreurs of Lafayette, Louisiana

Downtown Busk Break: Les Grosses Erreurs of Lafayette, Louisiana

(VIDEO) You might have seen the members of Les Grosses Erreurs (The Big Mistakes) on the Downtown Mall over the past few days. The Cajun musicians are in Charlottesville from Lafayette, Louisiana, after a stop in Asheville. They’ll be busking and playing house shows until Monday. Here they play “I have a broken heart.” For […]

Louise Bittinger, 91, moved to Charlottesville from White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, to be closer to her daughter, Shirley Thompson (center). Since Bittinger opted for hospice care last year, Hospice of the Piedmont's Rosemary Flynn (right) has become part of the family, visiting Bittinger's apartment three times a week to bathe her and check how she's doing. Photo: John Robinson

Long journey home: A family’s experience with hospice care

Chronic heart disease and cancer are by far the top killers of American adults, and together with lung disease account for more than half of adult deaths each year, according to recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As the population continues to age, the money the government spends on health care is disproportionately focused on patients at the end of their lives.

UVA Women's Soccer team celebrates its ACC Tournament title at Wake/Med Soccer Park in Cary, N.C. last Sunday. Photo:  Jeff Najarian/Univ. of Virginia

UVA Women’s Soccer enters NCAA tournament play on a goal-scoring tear

After a troubling mid-season lull during which the UVA women’s soccer team dropped three games from five by one-goal margins, Coach Steve Swanson’s Cavaliers have gone on a tear, outscoring opponents 19-3 over a five game run. Virginia claimed the ACC Tournament championship with a 4-0 demolition of Maryland this past Sunday and begins its […]