Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

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Meet the New Year! Same as the old year? As C-VILLE’s journey through our archives comes to a close, it’s nice to know that the more our city changes, the more it stays the same. Case in point? You’re either a Gogol Bordello city or you ain’t—and Charlottesville, you most definitely are. New York City’s gypsy-punk act, which returns to perform at the Jefferson Theatre on New Year’s Eve (page 19), brings equal parts mosh pit and melting pot. It’s the sort of eclectic, cosmopolitan show that speaks as strongly of its audience as the performance itself. So when you toast to 2010, remember the words of another true original, designer Coco Chanel: “In order to be irreplaceable, one must always be different.” Hear, hear!

Paging through the archives

“A gypsy violin and a punk guitar, the semiotics of an Eastern Bloc cabaret—Gogol Bordello’s Slavic- and Israeli-descended musicians have turned cultural bric-a-brac into a kind of post-something happening. But despite the plentitude of imagery and derivations, their message seems to be simple…denouncing cynicism as a capitulation of the spirit, Gogol Bordello subscribes to the concept of theatrical abandon as an instrument of psychic liberation.”

Harry Terris
November 19, 2002

 

Getting covered

 

February 15, 2005

 

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Ice, ice, baby—too cold? Too much? It’s been about 14 years since we received a winter wallop like the snow-smacking we got last weekend. And when C-VILLE revisited our coverage of the blizzard of 1996, we found that our city deals with nearly two feet of the fluffy white stuff the same way it did then. The Department of Public Works attacks main roads with salt, a few folks throw on their cross-country skis…and the rest of us? Well, we stay indoors and pick up a good read. Remember, readers: Much like the mail, C-VILLE must go through.

Paging through the archives

“And even as City crews scraped and hauled around the clock, residents began to complain. ‘The roads ain’t too good,’ an Angus Road man said, unforgettably, to The Daily Progress last week, summing up what everyone but an Inuit tribesman would conclude. The Virginia Department of Transportation, responsible for clearing County roads, took it on the chin as Albemarlians groused that the streets in their subdivisions remains winter wonderlands as late as Wednesday.”

John Blackburn
January 16, 1996

 

 

 

Getting covered

January 16, 1996

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Eight games into last year’s basketball season, former UVA coach Dave Leitao and his Cavaliers had a 4-4 overall record. One year and one coach later, new guy Tony Bennett and the Wahoos find themselves holding steady at the same spot. Throw in the recent announcement of new head football coach Mike London, and it’s enough to make any Virginia sports fan wonder if it’s true that the more things change, the more they stay the same. After all, we certainly haven’t seen any NCAA championships since C-VILLE covered the departure of head coach Pete Gillen in 2005. Then again, maybe big changes get our hopes up. In 1995, Restaurantarama weighed in on the tiny changes that made one local restaurant a persistent winner. Pick us up next week to see what else has changed in the last 20 years.

Paging through the archives

Restaurantarama, December 12, 1995

“Lately, observant [C&O] diners have noticed subtle architectural changes—each occurring without fanfare one after the other.

“First, about two years ago, floodlights showed up to enliven the facade at night. Then came a beautiful new heart-pine front door. Last winter, a brand new Tuli Kivi soapstone woodstove replaced the aging iron thing that had been trying to keep the mezzanine warm. Last year also saw a beautiful curved opening cut into a wall—so first-timers wouldn’t get lost in the twisty, turny interior. A few weeks ago, a wooden canopy went up over the door. Sound mundane? It’s not; it’s a beautiful heart-pine creation. With some artful curves echoing the tall bar stools in the bistro, it’s a Charlottesville original: Albemarle Art Nouveau.”

Getting covered

March 22, 2005

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Well before Governor Tim Kaine took an interest in your health, your friends at C-VILLE offered to coach you through the painful process of kicking cigarettes just because it is a sound thing to do. Now that a statewide ban on smoking in restaurants is in effect, you may want to heed our advice. Visit the archives on c-ville.com for tips on butting out. Likewise, walking is an idea whose time has come—or come around again. Six years ago, we reported on the alarmingly high percentage of third graders who were either obese or at risk of getting there. Walking was encouraged then, for the sake of their health. This week, we make a similar recommendation—for the sake of cutting fuel usage. Healthier kids, healthier planet: two positive outcomes from one simple step.

Paging through the archives

John Borgmeyer, April 22, 2003

Getting covered

January 4, 2005

 

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In the 20 years that we’ve been hitting the streets over the winter holidays, we have not always taken a consistent approach. In 1990, for instance, we practically begged readers to turn away with our promise of a “Boring XMAS Issue.” But by 2006, we were fully in the spirit, putting Special Correspondent Sweet Cakes on assignment with gift giving suggestions that spell the word “generosity” in all caps. Stop complaining, and start giving back. That’s what we say now. And don’t forget to check back next week for more wisdom hard-won over the past 20 years.

Paging through the archives

“…darlings, darlings, darlings, it must be said: Sweet has enough stuff! Please give her not so much as one more lip-liner brush, nor a striped cardigan, neither another pot of Nars eye shadow and certainly no more cake platters! (That’s a family joke.)

“Sweet anticipates your protests. You want to give. Very good.… While they may not improve anyone’s silhouette, these gift ideas will upgrade your moral and social profile, your dearest narratrix assures you.

“Charity, lovelies. Philanthropy. That’s what Sweet is talking about. If you want La Cake to know how much you luff her, show her by donating to a worthy cause, something that, like Sweet, strives to make the world a lovelier, gentler place. (Send her a delicate, perfumed note telling her of your efforts. That’s all the gift she really needs.)

“Let’s say you’re artistic—and this is not hard to say as all of Ms. Cakes’ friends have what you might call cultural leanings. Please consider giving some cash in your dear friend’s name to the City Center for Contemporary Arts… “O.K., suppose you want something more do-goodery. The Free Clinic could always use your support. From what Sweet can gather some people go to the doctor for reasons other than elective cosmetic procedures—they need prenatal vitamins or to have their boils lanced or something—and the Free Clinic will take care of them, case closed.…

“Other ideas? Meals on Wheels, which for decades has been feeding the elderly and housebound just because it’s the right thing to do. How about the Music Resource Center, which keeps kids off the streets and in the recording studios where they belong? There’s always the SPCA, where Fifi gets a fighting chance to go home with a new fashion-conscious family.

“See, don’t you feel better already? Well, you certainly look better. Your skin is positively glowing from that magic elixir called Doing the Right Thing.”

Sweet Cakes
November 28, 2006

Getting covered

 

End of the Year Issue, 1990

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It’s that time of the year again for two great traditions that go great together. We speak, ’natch, of the time-honored practice of lying about the status of your term paper. With finals looming, one corner of Charlottesville is teeming with procrastinators—the kind of people to whom we paid tribute 19 years ago for their many excuses for blown deadlines. Not that thesis-eating dogs are the only animals that deserve recognition in late November. Turkeys rank right up there—especially wisecracking ones like Tom “the Angry” Turkey, whom we “interviewed” four years ago, on the cusp of the slaughter.

Paging through the archives

“‘Eagles, Ravens, Cardinals. If football and Thanksgiving are a natural pair, why not the Turkeys?’

“‘Not to get all self-loathing on you, but have you ever seen a turkey? Interacted with a turkey? Even caught a glimpse of a turkey on TV? If so, you would know that there is nothing about a turkey to inspire thoughts of fleet-footedness, fear, or alpha-maledom—all of which are qualities football teams aspire to conjure when they christen themselves.

“‘That said, Virginia Tech apparently didn’t get the memo. Their HokieBird is derived from a turkey, which sucks for them for the following reasons: First, turkeys are hardly athletic. They’re so fat their wings can barely lift them half an inch off the ground. They’d definitely be picked last for a fifth-grade game of dodgeball. Second, they’re dumb as a box of rocks. While they don’t drown in the rain as rumor has it, when they get scared they all crowd together in a corner and the stupid animal at the bottom often suffocates. One can only hope for the sake of the species that Darwinian theory ensures that in each instance the bird that dies is the stupidest of the stupid flock.’”

Nell Boeschenstein
November 22, 2005

Getting covered

November 27, 1990

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The first time we can recall reporting on someone’s grand scheme to restore the Jefferson Theater as a performance venue, after years as the Movie Palace, was 17 years ago. Before the property was picked up at auction by a local newspaper editor who then sold it 14 years later to a local music promoter/band manager/real estate mogul, community theater director and producer Peter Ryan espoused hopes to convert it to a 300-600 seat performance venue. Well, capacity for the new Jefferson is projected at about 750, but otherwise the ideas are not too dissimilar. And, while we’re talking about things that fundamentally remain unchanged, let’s turn our sights to the 58th District, which this week re-elected Delegate Rob Bell for a fifth term. When John Borgmeyer sat in with the rookie legislator in 2004, the question on our minds was whether Bell could write his own ticket. For the next two years, at least, and judging from last week’s decisive victory, the answer is clear.

 

Paging through the archives

“…Ryan is interested in the Palace because the stage and theatrical capabilities are already there. The Movie Palace began life as the Jefferson Theater and was used for a variety of stage activities, including vaudeville. Behind the movie screen, a four story high flyspace looms above like a huge elevator shaft for scenery to be hauled up and down. With a backstage that is fifty by fifty feet, there is plenty of room for the workings of any theater production. ‘The Palace is really much like a Broadway house,’ Ryan says.”

Arts Watch (anon.)
January 22, 1992

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

February 24, 2004

 

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This year’s Virginia Film Festival, “Funny Business,” will not inaugurate a new era of Virginia Film Festivals wherein funny things—and celebrities—happen. (Onetime local Steven Soderbergh popped in 16 years ago, for Cripes sake!) Things have always tended to get a little funny when Tinseltown’s A- through C-listers come to town. As we reported 10 years ago, the good news then was that Sigourney Weaver was not dropped from a spacecraft into an intergalactic penal colony filled with murderers with YY-chromosomal anomalies. (Alien 3—rent it.) The bad news, however, was that the badly dressed badass’ “flights were screwed up,” and the alien annihilator was late for VFF’s opening gala. Even when Weaver finally showed, those who didn’t catch her in the flash of the cameras likely didn’t catch her at all.

From the archives

“‘She,’ of course, was Hollywood mega-star Sigourney Weaver, aka Ellen ‘Get away from her, you bitch’ Ripley, the badass space heroine of Alien, Aliens, and Alien: Resurrection. Weaver’s high-tech characterizations actually date back to the slime-shooting days of Ghostbusters, but as the minutes ticked by, there was growing trepidation that anything but time-travel would get her to the Bayly on time. Apparently her flights were screwed up.

 

“Video artist Daniel Reeves was delivered to reporters as a sort of human coming-attraction, and the press tolerated his quiet musings on alternative exhibit spaces (his work was on display at the old train station) until the call went up ‘She’s here!’ at which point Reeves was dropped like so much stale popcorn.

“Alas, she was not here, and the ever-hungering press corps was left to salivate after the forbidden plates of battered chicken and quesadillas that festival partiers brought outside.

“The lights started flashing again when a Jayne Mansfield lookalike made her way up the path, preceded by a helium bosom and followed by gawking stares. Too bad, she was ‘nobody,’ and the Sigourney vigil pressed on.

“And then, as if in a movie, the leading lady graciously walked into the scene. Fair and tall in a green see-through overblouse and knee-high suede boots, she was reassuringly lined of face and charmingly lucid of thought. Yes, she loved working with [Stan] Winston on Aliens; yes, it was lovely to be at last on terra firma; and yes, she’d love to talk about her new movie. A Map of the World was a ‘real acting experience,’ she declared. Performing in sci-fi stuff, by contrast, was fun but left no lasting impression.

“She took a few more questions as the crowd pressed closer. She shook a few hands. And then, in a flash, she was gone.”

Cathy Harding
October 26, 1999

Getting covered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 3, 1993

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If there’s one thing we’ve learned in 20 years of covering Charlottesville, it’s this: Folks here are political animals, but they’re not always electoral animals. Consider that seven years ago winning a measly 11 percent—11 bleedin’ percent!—of city voters was enough to land a new guy on City Council. We’re hoping that the pollsters are wrong when they assume that last year’s robust turnout was merely an Obama blip. Instead, can we rally for healthy participation, so that, whoever leads Charlottesville and Albemarle next, we can all believe in the results? And, while we’re at it, here’s a reminder that sometimes the political process is ruled by fate, such as the sad turn of events eight years ago that ultimately landed Creigh Deeds at the top of this year’s state Democratic ticket. If you miss Emily Couric, honor her devotion to civic duty and get to the polls. 

Paging through the archives

“On May 9, 2002, Rob Schilling sat at his home computer and created a pair of posters lettered with the words

‘Thank You.’ With his wife—and constant companion—Joan, he then spent the sunny Thursday afternoon standing on the corner of McIntire and Preston, waving the signs and smiling at rush hour traffic.

“Two days earlier, Schilling had defeated Democrat Alexandria Searls for one of two contested seats on Charlottesville’s five-member City Council. He won 2,169 votes, 359 fewer than the overall winner, incumbent Blake Caravati. Only 11 percent of the City’s registered voters had cast their ballots for Schilling, so out of the hundreds of motorists who saw his posters, probably only a handful understood the message. The rest had to wonder, who are those people?”

John Borgmeyer
July 22, 2003

Getting covered

October 23, 2001

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Welcome to the 42nd week of our year-long trip through two decades of C-VILLE archives. Here is your table. Here is your napkin. Your server will be with you shortly. In the meantime, please peruse this menu of C-VILLE’s previous coverage of food and drink. You’ve got your Food Issues—our annual Food & Drink spectaculars that have, since 2002, spotlighted what’s tastiest from local restaurants, farms and wineries. And you’ve got your food issues—the many times C-VILLE has devoted ink to the politics and economics of eating. We’ve been on the eat beat for quite a while, and we hope you’ve enjoyed the buffet!

Getting covered

 

October 21, 2003

 

September 21, 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 18, 2005

 

August 1, 2006

 

 

 

 

September 22, 2006

 

October 17, 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 23, 2007

 

July 10, 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 25, 2007

 

April 1, 2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 17, 2008

 

August 18, 2009

 

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We’re 41 weeks into this year-long archive search, and with this issue the theme is musical entertainment. First, what has become the perennial question of which music venues will survive: We asked that last week with the shuttering of Is, just as we pondered it 12 years ago, as Trax started to unravel. Then, the matter of the UVA Pep Band. We grant you, some might argue whether it was musical, but it was certainly entertainment. When, in a gesture six years ago that ushered in the era of the Cavalier Marching Band, this week’s cover subject, John Casteen apologized to West Virginians for a Pep Band skit that had gone too far, we were not amused. For that the UVA Prez earned from us a year-end Cheap Shot award.

Paging through the archives

“Despite holding three degrees in English, UVA President John Casteen must have never learned the definition of the word ‘joke.’ Maybe he’s never seen the ‘Award-Winning Virginia Fighting Cavalier Indoor/Outdoor Precision Marching Pep Band,’ either.”

John Borgmeyer
December 30, 2003

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

September 23, 1997

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“If music be the food of love, play on,” says Orsino in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, a local production of which we praised in 2007 for its direction, musical numbers and actors—one of whom happens to be the subject of this week’s cover story. Local thespian Clinton Johnston is directing the Four County Players in Othello for the next few weeks, giving us another reason to highlight his talents. And speaking of talent, with the closing of Is last week, we were reminded of Gravity Lounge, another venue that closed earlier this year. Join us next week for another backstage look at C-VILLE’s history.

Paging through the archives

“Though Clinton Johnston and Eamon Hyland are a brilliant pair as Olivia’s ‘drunkle,’ Sir Toby Belch and his protegé, Sir Andrew Aguecheek (by way of Jaleel White’s ‘Steve Urkle’), Allen Van Houzen’s turn as Feste the Fool binds the three, through an unflinchingly giddy, quick-tongued delivery of even quicker puns.”

Brendan Fitzgerald
August 13, 2007

Getting covered

February 17, 2009

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We know that for years you’ve been seeing other people—and we’ve been watching you watching them. That’s right, we’re talking about TV. Eleven years ago, we celebrated the rise of cable-access wunderkind  Trevor Moore, who went on to a Hollywood career from Covenant High School. And speaking of D-Listers, we subjected C-VILLE TV critic Eric Rezsnyak to hours of Kathy Griffin’s show, “My Life on the D-List,” which included among its episodes her visit to Charottesville to, er, perform at the Paramount. He captured some of what might be called the highlights of that segment. To be clear, Rezsnyak watched a screener. It’s our understanding that when the show finally hit the airwaves, the classic medical moment was no longer on view. Pity, that.

Paging through the archives

 

“2. After the show, Paramount impresario Chad Hershner informs Griffin that, ‘I have a group of about 20 gay guys who have stayed to see you…’ Charming.

 “1. Dr. John Hong (who is, at the very least, among the 20 gay guys Hershner alluded to) pays Griffin a backstage visit. The moment he crosses the threshold into the D-lister’s dressing room, the internist/ medical columnist/ice dancer ceases to be a human being and, for the next five minutes, more closely resembles a cartoon caricature of a human being. Seriously, it’s like Griffin is acting in Who Framed Roger Rabbit? as Hong literally hops around the room just squealing with excitement that he’s getting to meet this woman, the tertiary lead on ‘Suddenly Susan.’ He tells her she is his favorite comedienne of all time, is ‘so hot’ and ‘so sexy, baby.’ The viewer ponders what might happen should he meet, say, Nicole Kidman, but quickly forgets all that once he starts inquiring about her gynecological health and busts out what I would propose to be Charlottesville’s new tourism slogan: ‘If you ever need a Pap, come over here to Charlottesville. Dr. Hong.’ Can’t you just see the billboards?”

Eric Rezsnyak
May 30, 2006

Getting covered

 

May 12, 1998
 

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Law and order is a great deal more complex than any 60-minute TV show can convey. It’s not just evidence and a verdict, that’s for sure. And that’s one reason we’ve looked at it from many angles over the years. From the gulf between the ideals of community policing and the funding it requires, to the programs that aim to help inmates see themselves in a new light, to this week’s cover story on the challenges of getting free—even with all that and more we can barely untangle the criminal justice system. We expect to visit this topic many more times in the next 20 years. Sadly, we expect that even so, we’ll still only scratch its surface.

Paging through the archives

“He’d always liked drawing, so Kiheem Byers was glad to pick up some new skills in Lindsay Michie Eades’ charcoal drawing class. ‘She showed me how to make something look close if it’s close, or if it’s far away how to make it look far away. Or faces—how to balance it out,’ putting eyes, nose and mouth in the right positions…

 

“Some of the visions surprised him. ‘There’s a lot of talented people in the jail,’ he says. In Rose Hill’s class, one of his cellmates made a painting on a ceramic piece that expressed a kind of togetherness. ‘I was basically living with him and I didn’t know he was feeling the way he was. That was good.’

“Byers expects to be transferred to a penitentiary. ‘I hope to get into some art programs’ there, he says. ‘I hope to further my education, keep busy, do something positive.’ He’s glad that proceeds from the art he made in ACRJ classes will give other inmates the chance to experience what he did. ‘It’s good to give back. It’s a beautiful thing for people,’ he says.

“One thing he learned was especially freeing—that ‘there are no mistakes in art,’ he says. “I have a problem with perfection, so that was something new. My art was perfect in my eyes.’”

Erika Howsare
February 9, 2007

Getting covered

October 5, 2004

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It’s amazing to us that a little less than 13 years ago, we sent a reporter to investigate a pending facelift in Belmont and he came back writing about the neighborhood’s “P.R. problem.” Sheesh, where did that go? These days, the place has an image too hip for its own good. At least that’s what it seems like when residents start yelling about yet another damn restaurant near the intersection of Monticello Road and Hinton Avenue, the same juncture where our reporter formerly discovered that “signs of life are few.” $55,200 houses? A dearth of white-collar residents? Not anymore, honey.

Nine years after that Belmont story, in December 2005, we brought you a different kind of development news: 18,725 new houses in the pipeline for Charlottesville and Albemarle. When it comes to growth, it’s just as we noted then: “The word alone is enough to start an argument. We need more! We need less! Hardly anyone seems to think things are just right as they are.”

Then again, as the intervening years have made clear, the real estate market always has the last laugh.

Paging through the archives

“It’s mid-morning in Charlottesville’s Belmont neighborhood, and signs of life are few at the intersection of Monticello Road and Hinton Avenue, an area nicknamed ‘Downtown Belmont.’ The buzz of an air drill can be heard in a nearby garage, while a few cars move down the narrow road lined with somewhat rickety mini-marts and frame houses…

 

“Still, Belmont’s disrepair has a gritty charm—a charm that many residents want to preserve, albeit with less grit. This year, City officials are spending more than $300,000 for a Belmont facelift…

“‘I’m excited about these improvements,” says architect Joe Celentano, a Belmont resident for 10 years and owner of a stucco and wood frame house on Belmont Avenue for the last two. ‘Belmont has a lot to offer in the sense of a neighborhood.’

“Celentano, a member of a City task force to improve Belmont, is just the type of person City officials want more of in the stucco-fied neighborhood.

“They want white-collar folks with families who see opportunity in rickety old houses; folks who enjoy a front-porch culture, where neighbors visit each other; and folks who don’t mind when the smell from Moore’s Creek Sewage Treatment plant wafts up every so often from the valley…

“Better yet, cool housing is affordable in Belmont for low- to mid-income folk: the median value of a house —mostly proud but repair-hungry frame houses dating from the 1890s and onward—is $55,200, compared to an average of $84,000 for the entire City, according to a local study.”—Jonathan Fox, October 29, 1996

Getting covered

 

“Recently Charlottesville has seen 477 new residential units go up, with places like Coran Capshaw’s Walker Square Apartments on W. Main Street, or Frank Stoner’s Belmont Lofts setting the tone for the thousands of new units that are on the way. Much of the city’s new commercial space will be combined with residential space, a trend known as ‘mixed-use’ development. Part of the City’s plan is for suburban refugees and Wahoos to be able to walk instead of driving their cars.

“In Albemarle, C-VILLE’s development forecast points to the designated growth areas: Pantops, Crozet and Route 29N will continue exploding with new apartment buildings, subdivisions and big-box shopping centers…

“The brew is percolating, so to speak, with recent news of one of the area’s biggest land deals ever. Last month the Breeden family sold its 1,353-acre farm, known as Forest Lodge [or Biscuit Run], for more than $46 million. Developer Hunter Craig, rumored to be backed by the giant Toll Brothers homebuilding company, purchased the parcel and could put nearly 5,000 homes just south of Charlottesville.”—John Borgmeyer and Nell Boeschenstein, December 6, 2005

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This week’s feature story on Nelson County butcher Richard Bean fits nicely into the ongoing coverage of local food and drink that we at C-VILLE have been publishing for a number of years now. A lot of it’s been in a celebratory vein: introducing you to Virginia winemakers, giving shout-outs to the restaurants that list Keswick arugula on their menus, filling you in on the best ways to use those peaches you bought at the City Market (see our monthly ABODE section). But growing all that food is serious business, and accordingly, local farmers face serious issues. In late 2007, some of our local food coverage was a little less sweet than sour, as a legal battle engulfed Double H Farm. For some people, the case was a lot more disturbing than any hog carcass could be.

Paging through the archives

 

“[The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’] avid pursuit has led to suspicions that VDACS has targeted Double H to make an example of the small farmer.

“‘It’s not up to us to decide what the law is,’ says Elaine Lidholm, a VDACS spokesperson. ‘We don’t make the law, we just enforce it. Right now the law does apply to everyone across the board.’

“‘If you’re asking if they’ve been treated in a discriminatory way, I would say no,’ says [Polyface Farms owner Joel] Salatin. ‘VDACS is trying to hold them to the letter of the law. If you want my feeling on if it’s a good law, that’s another whole discussion. The most critical issue here is that all of Richard’s and Jean’s customers who buy their food because it’s better than any place else are now being denied the freedom of food choice to decide to patronize their excellent products. That should raise the hackles of every red-blooded American.’

“One of those is Paul Kingston, a UVA professor of sociology who has been named interim associate dean for arts, humanities and social sciences. ‘I told [Bean and Rinaldi] the first time I ate one of the their pork chops that I considered it life transforming,’ he says. ‘I’ve been on a quest to find the ultimate pork chop and I found it.’”—Jayson Whitehead, October 2, 2007

Getting covered

Photo by Jason Lappa
November 6, 2007

“‘The average person eats 70 pounds of beef a year,’ says Joel Salatin over the caws of the hens parading around the people gathered on his Polyface Farm in Swoope, Virginia, for the second annual Legislators on the Farm Day. Two politicians—one aspiring, the other an incumbent—stand behind him, waiting their turns.

“If there is one figure that has united the local food movement, perhaps even nationwide, it is Salatin. A third-generation farmer, he has become the focal point of a band of intensely devoted individuals who view as a fundamental right their ability to sell meat and vegetables they have raised directly to consumers. The fact that the government, the USDA specifically, must intervene in the middle of this process is an accepted but hardly tolerated evil.

“While Salatin has been at this for decades, he is at his most visible now, thanks at least in part to a 2006 book called Omnivore’s Dilemma. Lovingly crafted by author Michael Pollan, the tome details a litany of abuses wrought by industrial agriculture while balancing those against the efforts of indigenous farmers like Salatin. It has become a Bible for the movement and by placing Salatin at its center made him its messiah.”—Jayson Whitehead

 

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Stand up and be counted. When C-VILLE first started reporting on the best of what’s around here, we relied exclusively on our own wit and wisdom—earned from hours spent sitting in a cramped basement! Since then, we’ve gone the full circuit, seeking your insights over ours, dear readers, on an electronic ballot. This year we return with the rack of opinions you rely on to add spice to your votes. But you still get the final word. Send your vote for best “Best” cover to mailbag@c-ville.com.

Getting covered

 

February 27, 1996

July 8, 1997


April 7, 1998

April 13, 1999

July 18, 2000

August 27, 2002

August 5, 2003

August 3, 2004

August 2, 2005

August 8, 2006

August 14, 2007

August 12, 2008

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Temps have been cooler than usual, but one thing that has stayed hot for four summers running is our annual photo contest. The art director heads to the beach and we turn to you, dear readers, to fill in the picture. Though you share with us images from every imaginable aspect of local life, the winning pictures since 2006 have an obvious common thread—kids! Maybe it’s just a coincidence. After all, the panel of judges changes every year. Regardless, we like to think a youthful spirit pervades every issue of C-VILLE, whether children take the cover or not. Twenty years old and still keeping it fresh: It’s kind of an unofficial motto around here.

 

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

Photo by Johnny St. Ours
July 17, 2006

Photo by Helen Hamady
July 24, 2007

Photo by Sarah Cramer
June 24, 2008

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Certain mysteries remain unsolved, lo these two decades. To wit: Why did local musician Stephen Barling pen his music column under the name Cripsy Duck? (We know, but if we tell you, then we’ll have to serve you with fried rice.) Why do people keep coming back for more once they decide to move away from Charlottesville? While the answers remain unknown, we consider it our duty to pursue them anyway from time to time. If nothing else, it amuses, and that, among other things, has clearly been part of C-VILLE’s mission for the past 20 years. And so it shall be for the next 20 or more. Why? We just can’t explain it.

Paging through the archives

 

“Somebody’s yelling at me. ‘Crispy! Yo, man, Crispy Duck!’ I turn around and am confronted by a bullish man who’s found me out. Drat! My secret identity’s been compromised!

“‘Mission control,’ I’m whispering into my lapel mic. ‘ABORT, ABORT!’

“He’s babbling: ‘Hey man, when you gonna cover my band, man?’

“‘Did they tell you not to do anything on us? I believe they got it out for us.’

“Clearly, the beer has soaked through his paranoia buffer. I spend the next five minutes explaining that, despite conspiracy theories to the contrary, C-VILLE doesn’t have it ‘out’ for anyone. It’s not journalistically proper. And it wouldn’t be cool. Besides, it’s easy enough to generate animosity just by telling the truth.

“‘And by the way,’ I state in closing, ‘it’s criPsy, not criSpy.’ That always gets ‘em.”—Stephen Barling, aka Cripsy Duck, November 2, 1999

Getting covered

 

“We’re here because Charlottesville is a place where we can work and live and date and have friends and theoretically copy our files to computer disks without the computer eating them. In most places you have two areas of operation: you and your intimate associates—lovers, friends, family—and a nebulous ‘society’ out there in the distance—the stuff on TV, the stuff in newspapers. In New York, there’s your intimate circle and the untouchable myth of New York beyond. In Richmond, there’s your intimate circle and the untouchable myth of America beyond.

“But in a town of this size with a public space like the Mall, a middle ground opens up. A space where you’re not on intimate terms but still influential, a space between the near and the far. That means Charlottesville isn’t starkly divided between the Somebodies and the Nobodies. Everybody is sort of a Somebody, and nobody is entirely a Nobody. (The down side is that nobody is entirely a Somebody and everybody is something of a Nobody.) The Mall has grown so much in popularity it’s becoming more like a vague outer circle (You should have been here back before people like you showed up!), but you can still learn things about group behavior you can’t learn watching TV.”—Joel Jones. June 24, 2003

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Some bouts mean more than others. The struggle against bulldozers and development is no laughing matter. It concerns the look and temperament of a place, and if a battle is lost, hardly anyone can call for a do-over. What would that even mean? In light of major changes underway in McIntire Park, we consider the history of Vinegar Hill, which inspires in many people feelings of regret over a place lost to backhoes and notions of “improvement.” Those very emotions were captured a couple of years ago by William James, a local playwright who penned Vinegar Hill Revisited. Another kind of theater—and battle—earns our attention this week, too, but it’s far lighter in spirit than matters of road-building and urban renewal. We speak of CLAW, the Charlottesville Lady Arm Wrestlers, that outlandish mix of circus and charity that sprang up monthly last year and will return for one time only this weekend. Whether it’s bouts between beauties or man against the machine, we’re getting you the story week after week. We’ve been fighting deadlines to do it for 20 years, and we’re glad to say, we haven’t lost one yet.

Paging through the archives

“‘I saw Zion Union as they tore away her bricks,’ begins a monologue by Mary Lou. ‘That beautiful Church was like a well-robed Lady, gorgeous.

They stripped her naked. We got to see her bared planks. What her bricks had covered for all those years, from 1907 to 1964 was revealed to the world. Then the Wrecking Cranes and the Battering Rams came to rape her! Threw her to the ground and penetrated her! She had stood before them helpless, humble and chaste; and they laid her down to the earth, prostrate and disgraced.’”

—Scott Weaver quoting William James’ play, November 27, 2007

Getting covered

Nov. 4, 2009
 

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It’s a matter of precision. With the word “local” at risk of becoming a term as ubiquitous and somewhat meaningless as “green” or “organic,” as this week’s cover story illustrates, we remind you of the specific use of that term when we applied in our cover package from last year, “How local can you go?” In that piece, Cathy Clary introduced us to area farmers who participate in Community Supported Agriculture—the direct-to-consumer food movement. For CSAs “local” means “grown right here.” By contrast, for Wal-mart and other corporations, it seems to mean “sold right here.” Further, on the subject of precision, we will let you consider whether the ongoing Meadowcreek Parkway controversy still merits a war-like comparison (maybe you’d say, “Yes, more so now than ever!”). Meanwhile, we’ll continue our endeavors to cover local news precisely and meaningfully. It’s a course we’ve been on for 20 years, and much like a road that seems inevitable and a trend that keeps advancing, there’s no stopping us now.

Paging through the archives

“Current City Councilor Virginia Daugherty, who has voted to progress the project towards completion, is married to former City Councilor John Cover, who has changed his mind on the Parkway and has become one of its most vocal opponents.

“‘It just illustrates what a controversy this is,’ Daugherty says. ‘It happens even within the home—it’s like the Civil War.’

“And like the Civil War, Charlottesville will survive the Meadowcreek Parkway, whether it is built or not. Either way, McIntire Park will most likely be developed further by adding walking trails and perhaps a boating lake.”—Coy Barefoot, December 16, 1997

 

 

 

Getting covered

April 1, 2008


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Roads. We hate them, we love them, we pollute them, we rename them. We cannot get very far without them, but still we cannot make our peace with them—perhaps for good reason. Few local issues rival the Meadowcreek Parkway for longevity and heat. With last week’s decision from Judge Jay Swett that the city of Charlottesville acted lawfully in transferring McIntire Park land to VDOT for the controversial road, the 40-year debate returns to the news. Three years ago we considered some of that very land in our occasional series “Places We’ll Lose.” John Borgmeyer described the nine-hole golf course that will be indelibly altered when the Parkway is finally completed (back then projections called for construction in 2008). “The McIntire course’s first hole affords a view that you can’t get anywhere else in Charlottesville (outside the master bedroom of a swanky condo, that is),” Borgmeyer wrote. “The tee sits below a canopy of gnarled trees; hit a true shot and the eye follows an arc through a wide blue sky, a path of lazy clouds that disappear over the forested ridge rippling to the east, dropping into a broad fairway of Bermuda grass among ancient old-growth oaks—some with trunks wider than a bundle of telephone poles.”

PAGING THROUGH THE ARCHIVES

“Yeah, it’s a free society, M.G. But there is a long list of things you’re just not allowed to do.

“You can’t yell ‘fire!’ in a crowded theater (although it probably won’t do much harm at a showing of Air Bud II). You can’t pay someone to have sex with you (unless you’re first willing to pay for a plane ticket to Nevada). And in Charlottesville and Albemarle County, you’re not allowed to put up signs advertising your business on any of the road right-of-ways (unless you want to fork over big bucks for a billboard).

“Which means the sign you’re referring to that has been out on Route 250 all summer long is definitely a no-no.”—Ace Atkins, August 25, 1998

 

 

 

GETTING COVERED


June 13, 2006
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We cannot deny it. We’ve picked up some trade secrets in the past 20 years—at least as far as living local goes. But we’ve also done more than our fair share to make sure some things, like the City Market, remain well-known, public treasures. Year after year, we have compiled lists of summer must-dos and dressed them in…er, random…covers. Well, we’ve been at it long enough that there’s no reason now to limit our guidance and expertise to three months of the year. And that gets us to this week’s cover story, listing 25 essential and timeless Charlottesville experiences for true insiders. Stick with us, week after week, all you wannabe and getting-there locals, as we track through the reportage and insight that make us your indispensable guide to life in this here lively town. 

 

Paging through the archives

“I have a friend who won’t go out on summertime Friday nights. Why not? ‘I have to be at the City Market when it opens.’ Okay. This is one of the most happening spots in the city. I’ve seen doctors, lawyers, riff-raff, common folk, hoi-poloi cruising the flowers and produce. There are also crafts and a coffee stand for those who don’t do well at seven in the ayem. You know the place—Water & First Streets. You know the time—Saturday mornings from 7:00 until noon. You know the ambience—funky cool.”—Jenny Mead, May 27, 1997

 

 

 

 

Getting covered


May 27, 1997

 

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Is there anything that won’t thrive in Charlottesville? In 24 weeks of looking back through our 20-year archives, the answer seems to be no. Whether it’s local rock or a rock-hard will to reconfigure local buildings and public spaces, people in Charlottesville get things done. Take Jessica Nagle, for instance. Her drive to remake Downtown Charlottesville has been on full display all month as the Festival of the Photograph, of which she is a co-founder, transforms trees and facades into screens and frames for outstanding pictures. But for more than 10 years, she has demonstrated her commitment to rethinking tired locales. Fresh ideas and free access? Sounds like a winning combo made for the pages of C-VILLE. Check back next week for more historical tidbits from this still free and still free-thinking newspaper.   

Paging through the archives

 

“On December 14, a ribbon-cutting was scheduled…at what had been something of a black-hole on the Downtown Mall, the former operations center for Jefferson National Bank.

“One of the biggest buildings downtown, the 52,000 square-foot beast will soon be home to the explosively growing SNL Securities…for this special renovation, the person calling the shots is…Jessica Nagle.

“‘She’s bringing life,’ says well-known developer Gabe Silverman, ‘to a building that was closed to the street.’”

—Hawes Spencer, December 15, 1998

“Even if their financial database company, SNL Financial, didn’t pump 275 gainfully employed people into the Downtown economy, Jessica and Reid Nagle would deserve commendation simply for the makeover they accomplished a couple of years ago. They took the hulking monolith formerly known as the Spy Building (and officially dubbed the National Ground Intelligence Center) and transformed it into something approximating a sleek, city-centric pillar of white-collar industry.

“It wasn’t an impulse born of aesthetics that prompted them to relocate to 90,000 square feet on Seventh Street from their chunky brick building on Fourth Street. No doubt the deal they brokered with the City of Charlottesville to rent the Spy Building at rates far below market sweetened their interest in remaining Downtown. But what was the bottom line? Their company had outgrown its home. Again.”

—Cathy Harding, June 21, 2005

 

Getting covered

October 11, 2005

 

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In covering this town for 20 years, we’ve seen a lot of people go through changes. Friendships are made or restored. Folks change jobs or political persuasion. They get famous overnight. They throw surprise weddings. They die without warning. This week marks our 23rd visit to the archives, and we’re inspired by life’s markers: the recent wedding of two longstanding local musicians and the passing of a staff writer’s mother (who also happened to be a cofounder of a national law organization based in Charlottesville). Jesse Fiske of Hackensaw Boys fame wed Jen Fleisher of Jim Waive & The Young Divorcees fame late last month; well before we covered their nuptials as we do in “Making Marry” this week (p. 49), we were celebrating the other kinds of harmony they make. And the Rutherford Institute’s Carol Whitehead, loving wife and partner of John Whitehead and mother of former C-VILLE staffer Jayson Whitehead, died suddenly last week. A life begins and it’s all smiles; a life ends and it’s buckets of tears. When you’re family, you’re there for all of it. Stop by again next week to get more remembrances from what’s starting to feel like the C-VILLE kitchen table.

 

Paging through the archives

“Anna Matijasic shudders, visible through a window behind Jim Waive’s recording booth; she is the farthest removed from the rest of the band, tossed into a room with a dismantled black drum kit and a set of tattered cymbals laying on a shard of carpet. The band has played ‘House Full of Ghosts’ a handful of times now, but Waive wants Charlie Bell and Matijasic to trade spots in the songs where they’re taking solos, and the band is concerned about the song’s structure.

“‘I want to make sure we don’t shift from Eastern Bloc to German schnitzelhouse on the rhythm,’ Jen Fleisher calls from her booth, nearly invisible to Matijasic from her position across the span of Coles’ dark, wooden studio. She bobs a bit behind her enormous instrument, easily the most energetic of the bunch, although nearly everyone is in a playful mood.” —Brendan Fitzgerald, February 5, 2008
 

Getting covered

 

“My dad started to write his first of many books about America’s loss of direction when I began my formal education. It was 1975 and we were living in Los Angeles, where he had recently attended some kind of Christian seminary. My mom was working as a legal secretary and I had no idea why my unemployed dad was picking me up at noon from kindergarten—apparently, he would write in the morning—but almost every day we went out to the park and played sports: football, basketball and baseball.”

—Jayson Whitehead, in the introduction to his interview with his father, John Whitehead
September 2, 2008

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When you’ve been around as long as we have—20 years, as we’ve reminded you every week for the past 22 weeks—you’re bound to see some things come around again. And again. Steve Earle, for instance. The troubador returns to the Paramount for a night of pill-popping tunes about a year after his last visit, and as far as we’re concerned if he makes an annual pilgrimage to Central Virginia, that’d be just dandy. Let’s be honest, though, folks, there are some things we’ve seen in the past two decades that we hope to never lay eyes on again. An example? The 16-year-old cover reproduced below. Now, we love a Sly joke as well as the next alt weekly (cue a chorus of “Yo, Adrian” and a round of “Rambo” jokes). Sadly, we’re not sure this cover was meant to be…ironic. Inside the issue is an impenetrable review of Cliffhanger that leaves us with a deeper appreciation of Stallone’s, uh, simple vocabulary. Grunt here, if you know what we mean, and tune in next week for another blast from the past of this still free and still free-thinking weekly newspaper. 

Paging through the archives

“After five quick songs, Earle stepped back, took a breath and announced ‘This one goes out to what’s-her-name, wherever the hell she is,’ then began picking out ‘Now She’s Gone’ before moving into ‘Goodbye,’ singing, ‘Was I off somewhere, or just too high?’

“Sure, nobody can do regret with such swagger, but then defiance has always been Earle’s thing, even if it is his outlaw persona giving the finger to his more reflective side. There’s a sweet tension between the two, the ache of loss and the fuck-it-all attitude. Earle embodied both between the two songs, switching harmonicas and saying, ‘Same girl, different harmonica.’”

—Scott Weaver, April 22, 2008

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 1, 1993

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We’re 21 this week—21 weeks into our yearlong 20th birthday party, that is. And while some newcomers to the magic that is C-VILLE may not know it, longtime loyal readers can attest that we’ve had our eyes trained on local talent and the local scene—and scenery—the whole time. This week, a glance at what used to lie beneath. We mean, in this case, the Downtown Mall’s former bricks from back in the day before the mortar deteriorated so badly we had to keep a cobbler on speed dial. (Let us digress to say once again: We. Love. The. New. Bricks. Or at least the Editor does, anyway. Hear, hear, for successful public works projects!) Also in the nostalgic mix: an appreciation of Charlottesville’s fertile literary ground, a cultural base that predates those old bricks and which we hope will continue to fuel debate and excitement for another 20 years and more at this still free and still free-thinking weekly newspaper. 

 

Paging through the archives

“Deja Vu? Downtown Mall, Fridays After Five, 05/12/95”

—Photo by Larry Swank, published June 20, 1995

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

June 16, 1998

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We’re 20 weeks in to this 20th birthday party. We’re also less than a month away from the official start to summer, but Memorial Day marks its unofficial beginning so let the playtime begin! This week, a, er, backwards glance at our 1999 kick-off to summer activities as well our first take on a political development that, depending on who you are and how you look at things, was either a retreat or advance for local politics. We refer, savvy readers will realize, to Rob Schilling’s 2002 City Council victory, handed to him by a splintered Democratic party. Schilling was a one-term wonder, it turned out, losing in 2006. His party, the GOP, didn’t bother fielding anyone at all in the subsequent Council election. And technically, they’re not doing it now (or yet), either, despite the fact that the latest candidate to announce is a confirmed Republican. Well, Bob Fenwick can call himself an “Independent,” but we’re here to call ’em as we see ’em. C-VILLE: Still free and still free-thinking, two decades later.  

Paging through the archives

“Like most political contests, this one began with promises of substantial debate. ‘This is about issues, not about party labels,’ Schilling declared more than once. But as the race wore on, it seemed that Schilling, as well as Caravati and Searls, were deliberately shying away from relevant and controversial issues, such as the Meadowcreek Parkway, and instead reverting to tired rhetoric like ‘common sense leadership’ (Schilling), ‘healing old wounds’ (Searls) or ‘let’s keep a good thing going’ (Caravati). (Only Independent Stratton Salidis, perhaps liberated by his oft-professed expectation to lose, stressed issues, himself arguing for new thinking on transportation and education.)”

—John Borgmeyer, May 14, 2002

 

 

 

Getting covered

—June 8, 1999

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We’re ready to turn our volume knobs to the max for week No. 19  of our highly selective tour through the past 20 years of local news and arts in C-VILLE. This week, a pair of locally spawned bands that every music fan should be proud to call our own (even if we call ’em by their nicknames). In 1993, a pajama-clad Dave Matthews appeared on page one, a candid moment caught on a tour bus more than a year before his band’s first album, Under the Table and Dreaming, was released. (In fact, that release was the occasion for another Dave Matthews Band cover, the October 4, 1994 issue pictured.) For another local rock act, 1993 was a year of transition: Pavement, a band formed by UVA alum Stephen Malkmus, had released the critically beloved Slanted and Enchanted in 1992, and was working on material for 1994’s Crooken Rain, Crooken Rain between gigs. Songs from both bands get their due as part of our 45-song guide to essential local music here, but if our list and the paths of both bands prove one thing, it’s that our city is prone to changing its tune. Keep your dials set to C-VILLE for more on the soundtrack to your local life.

Paging through the archives

 

“We’ve had Stephen Malkmus [lead singer of Pavement] wrong for the last decade, and we’re only now starting to figure it out. He’s no slacker prince. Call him a clever bastard, a savvy manipulator, if those words didn’t carry the baggage of connotation.

“‘You know, Steve was nicknamed “bunny” in college because he’d stand in the window of his first-year dorm and play air guitar along to Echo and the Bunnymen songs,’ remembers Thane Kerner. ‘He has a tremendous attachment to the glamour side of pop, which contrasts the slacker, lo-fi image he projected with Pavement. He’s really a consummate stylist.’

“Consummate and talented. With plenty of years of rock and roll left in him, to boot. Pavement may be gone for good, and they’re solely missed, but I think we might be better off with what’s left.”

—James Graham, April 3, 2001

Getting covered

 

“The tape deck is still working at this point, and the conversation revolves around the esoteric jazz which Stefan [Lessard, bassist] has brought along from home. Carter [Beauford, drummer]’s wealth of knowledge about all things musical begins to reveal itself as he recognizes and names the various sidemen on the tape according to their different styles of play. ‘Hey Fonzy (Stefan’s nickname), that sounds like Scofield. And that sounds like Bill Frisell.’ ‘Yeah, it is. Turn this up. Carter, listen to this change right here. I think that’s a really cool change.’”

—Jack Bailey, June 30, 1993

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And we’re now 18 weeks into our highly selective tour through the past 20 years of local news and arts in C-VILLE. This week, familiar faces and familiar structures. Some 12 years ago, we reported on what seemed a likely outcome for the four storefronts known collectively now as the Wachovia buildings: demolition. If only! As we report on page 9 this week, not only do those buildings remain largely unchanged, the prospects for redevelopment have thinned yet again. And, in other news, a look back at two culinary architects of Downtown’s revival, Tim Burgess and Vincent Derquenne, whose opening in 2003 of yet another restaurant landed them on the cover. In current news, their struggles with the Board of Architectural Review to update that eatery, Bang, gets covered in Restaurantarama on page 37. Stay tuned next week for another not-entirely random stroll down memory lane. In fact, check back every week. All year long we will continue to look back at the accumulated pluck and provocations that will power this free and freethinking institution into the next 20 years. 

Paging through the archives

 

“Peer into the Downtown Mall’s crystal ball, and you may still see a wrecking ball in there—doing its damage to an entire block.

“Despite the sale of Jefferson National Bank to Wachovia…City Journal has learned that the plans to demolish JNB’s downtown block between East First and Second Streets are still alive and well…

“Should Wachovia decide to go forward with the plans after it has assumed ownership (JNB shareholders are expected to vote within the next few weeks), and should the B.A.R. and City Council approve the request, it looks like those run-down buildings will indeed be rubble-ized and something bigger and grander erected in their place.

“Word on the bricked street has it that some other local developers (did someone say Gabe Silverman?) may want to try and save the buildings and fix them up…”

—City Journal, September 9, 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

 

“Theirs was a chance meeting in the late 1980s, when both worked in a Crozet restaurant known as The Gallery. How could the then-20somethings know that at the intersection of routes 240 and 250, Derquenne’s Parisian upbringing and Burgess’ West Virginia roots would eventually become ingredients in one of the longest lived and most successful restaurant partnerships in the City? Could they have any idea, moreover, that together they would stumble upon what would soon become a trait of Charlottesville cuisine—the new French-Southern cuisine?”

—Kathryn E. Goodson
June 3, 2003

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And we just keep going in our highly selective tour through the past 20 years of local news and arts in C-VILLE. This week, it’s a numbers game. In 2004, we listed the top 10 highest-paid Charlottesville and Albemarle employees [Here’s a PDF of the 2004 story], with Robert Tucker topping the county’s list at $143,615. Five years later, not much has changed in the way of recipients, but the salaries? Nearly $40,000 more per person. Speaking of salaries, also back in 2004, we put a prominent man on page one. This week, he takes the No. 1 spot as most powerful man in the local arts scene, landing him on the front page again and leaving us with one conclusion: It’s Coran Capshaw’s world, we’re just living in it. Stay tuned next week for another not-entirely random stroll down memory lane. In fact, check back every week. All year long we will continue to look back at the accumulated pluck and provocations that will power this free and freethinking institution into the next 20 years. 

Paging through the archives

The times, they are a-changin’. This look at local salaries appeared in C-VILLE May 25, 2004. Click here to compare with today’s numbers.

Getting covered

“But despite attempts to keep his business ventures on the down-low and away from public scrutiny, Capshaw is the most exposed local player in real estate.

“‘I’m not sure why I’d be singled out for discussion,’ Capshaw tells C-VILLE of his public prominence. Pressed for a reason, Capshaw offers that perhaps his visible properties and ‘primary job’ as manager of DMB ‘all ties together’ in peoples’ minds.”

—Paul Fain, April 27, 2004

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And we just keep going in our highly selective tour through the past 20 years of local news and arts in C-VILLE. This week, a “green” story from a perhaps unexpected source: Dominion Power, whose Lake Anna nuclear facility, merely 30 miles from town, creeps closer and closer to expansion. Also, this week, remembrances of birthdays past as TJ turned 250 up at Monticello and the architect of Perestroika took notice. That was some 16 years ago, well before the gorgeous, new, enviro-tastic Visitors Center opened (which is just did last week to some rain-subdued fanfare), giving architects of every stripe reason to celebrate. Stay tuned next week for another not-entirely random stroll down memory lane. In fact, check back every week. All year long we will continue to look back at the accumulated pluck and provocations that will power this free and freethinking institution into the next 20 years. 

Paging through the archives

 

“GORBY & TJ (OR, THE ADVENTURES OF THE RED AND THE READHEAD). UVa’s seismograph station reported only a 1.5 Richter scale disturbance at Monticello’s graveyard during Gorbachev’s ‘Me and Jefferson Are Blood Brothers’ speech delivered as part of the 250th birthday celebration. According to one local geologist, the 1.5 quake suggests that Jefferson was spinning at fewer than 35 rpm—much more slowly than had been predicted. Gorbachev seemed to enjoy his visit and was only mildly surprised when a religious zealot of some kind with a huge beehive hairdo leaped from the crowd, Brillo pad in hand, and screamed ‘I will wipe that Mark of the Beast splotch off your Commie forehead once and for all!’”—“Critical Mass,” Steve R. Smith, April 21, 1993

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

 

“Pure white clouds float through a blue sky; pine-covered mountains cast their emerald reflections across a clear lake; a child’s muddy hands cradle the precious root ball of a tiny tree.

“This is the new face of nuclear power.

“The images appear against a green-and-purple background on the website for the Clean and Safe Energy Coalition. Scroll down, and there’s the smiling faces of Christine Todd-Whitman, former head of the Environmental Protection Agency, and Patrick Moore, a founder and former leader of Greenpeace, with the message that ‘today and for our future, nuclear power is a safe, clean, reliable and cost-effective way to balance our energy demands and protect our environment.’ Yes, you read that right—a founder of Greenpeace is a nuke cheerleader.”—John Borgmeyer, May 2, 2006

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

Though their cover dominance might suggest that in 20 years C-VILLE has covered nothing artsy but Dave Matthews Band, we want to set the record straight right here and now: Once in a while we have reported on other pressing cultural matters, including the controversy over the state song and the 20 minutes that Georgia O’Keeffe spent in our midst. We kid! Still, it cannot be denied that Dave and the Fellas have captured our attention from the start. Hey, we know a juggernaut when we see one. This week, in honor of DMB’s two nights at the John Paul Jones Arena, we offer a greatest hits package of DMB covers. Feel free to hum along. You know the tune.

 

“It all sounds so simple. Write a few songs. Recruit skilled musicians to interpret your ideas and help clarify arrangements. Have a ball playing great music. Dave Matthews remembers exactly how far from that rosy image their first rehearsal strayed. ‘The first time we played together early last spring we were awful. Not just kind of bad, I mean heinously bad. We tried a couple of different songs and they were all terrible.’”
—Stewart Deck, February 5, 1992

 

 

 

 

 

“In November, 1991, the group secured its first regular gig: Tuesday night at Trax. Soon they were packing the place. Then they took the show on the road. By the fall of 1992, DMB performed more often in Richmond than in Charlottesville. Our golden boys became the golden boys of the whole region. They put out a CD on their own Bama Rags label (Remember Two Things). The day before they got signed to RCA, they put out one last CD (the five-cut Recently) on Bama Rags. Then they put out a studio-recorded CD with RCA: Under the Table and Dreaming, which debuted on the Billboard charts at #34. They appeared in Rolling Stone. They got on MTV. They played for Dave Letterman. They did SNL. They toured, toured, toured, from Seattle to New Haven. Our golden boys became the toast of the nation.

“And now it looks like we’re going to have to share them with the rest of the world.

“From June 21 through July 11, the band is embarking on a European tour…”—Jennifer Niesslein, June 20, 1995

 

“C-VILLE asked DMB publicist Ambrosia Healy when the internationally renowned band might play in its hometown again. It’s been since the fall of 1994, for goodness sake.

“‘Where are they supposed to play?’ she responded.”
—Arts Watch, March 4, 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

“But his success has come with a hefty price tag. Although boosters heap praise upon the Dave Matthews Band (which includes violinist Boyd Tinsley, saxophonist LeRoi Moore, bassist Stefan Lessard, and drummer Carter Beauford) and Matthews’s acoustic collaborations with longtime friend Tim Reynolds, most music reviewers have turned on the guitarist with a vehemence that’s usually reserved for the Kennedy family.

“Various theories have arisen, but whatever the real cause, there’s no question that Matthews has become a critical scapegoat.”
—Joshua Green, July 29, 1997

 

 

 

“It’s Christmastime and Dave Matthews is standing in line with an armload of books in the Barracks Road Barnes & Noble. A few whispers are heard here and there from other customers, but the Dave, after signing a couple of autographs, walks out the door with his shopping bag.

“Just about everyone in Charlottesville has a Dave story. And soon they’ll only be memories.

“In the current issue of Rolling Stone magazine, Matthews says he’s taking a break from living in Jefferson’s Virginia. According to the article, he’s heading to Seattle to be with his wife, Ashley, who’s begun graduate school. He also wants to be close to Los Angeles to be near producer Glen Ballard, who saved the new Everyday album.

“What? Charlottesvillians gasp. Well, never fear: Matthews is quoted as saying, ‘It’s my home and I’m happy here,’ but adds, ‘I have to go where my wife is.’”
—Brigitte McCray, February 27, 2001

 

 

“Tickets for the first local DMB concert since 1994 sold out—after a presale to locals the previous day—in 35 minutes on the morning of Saturday, March 3.

“The fans who watched the first football game back at Scott Stadium in 1931 probably couldn’t imagine 50,000 Daveheads swarming down its aisles. Even the folks who, back in 1997, envisioned the expansion of the stadium might claim that music wasn’t on their minds either. But DMB fans, primed to enjoy the first concert hosted in Scott Stadium, must be glad that UVA spent three years on a new and improved arena.”
—Brigitte McCray, April 17, 2001

 

 

 

 

“Somehow I can’t help but feel like my grandfather must have when taking my teenage mother to Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium to scream at the Beatles. Cranky beyond my age, I find few things more frustrating than people who focus on stardom, on personality, on Dave’s unshavenness. Listen to the goddamn music, and don’t just wait for the crowdlights to pop on to cue you to start shrieking with glee when the chorus comes.

“By the end of the set, the reluctant triviamonger in me couldn’t help but notice that the band hadn’t played ‘Recently,’ ‘The Song that Jane Likes,’ ‘Jimi Thing,’ or ‘The Best of What’s Around’—the four songs that constituted Dave’s original four-track demo, recorded 10 years ago at Greg Howard’s home studio. How cool would it have been in Dave had, as an encore, recreated the original tape on stage?”
—James D. Graham, May 1, 2001

 

How do you guys gear up to get ready to go on a tour?
Boyd Tinsley: Take a deep breath. And keep on taking it.
Stefan Lessard: Pretend. You pretend that it’s not happening until the last day. I also like to have two weeks before the actual tour just to be at home, be with my family and garden. Put my plants in that I won’t see till the fall and just sort of spend time being real homey and stuff and then I get pumped up.
BT: It’s just, like, basically the night before I’ll get my gig clothes ready, I’ll get packed and I’ll get all the stuff ready. And I’ll just go “O.K., it’s time to go, let’s go.”
—Interview with Cathy Harding, May 10, 2005

 

 

“Lyle Begiebing is also a 15-year-old Dave Matthews Band fan. I meet him and Simon on another day at the Omni where we talk over iced tea and Cokes. Lyle was born here, and unlike Simon, he has seen the band twice. His parents went to UVA and used to go see the band on some of those early, electric nights. Lyle is a drummer, and in the concert he mostly watches Carter Beauford. ‘[Carter]’s the best around. I play along to the albums but it’s impossible to do everything he does. I’m trying to learn how to play the same style, like, open: He doesn’t cross [his arms] when he plays.’ …I ask him what it is exactly that he likes about the band and he says that he likes ‘how their songs aren’t, like, two-and-a-half minutes. It’s not held back … and they don’t have just like chorus, verse, bridge, chorus, all of that. It’s a lot more.”
—J. Tobias Beard, September 19, 2006
 

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

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Sailing along in our highly selective tour through the past 20 years of local news and arts in C-VILLE, we note this week one of the very few instances when we lagged in our cheerleading for a certain local musician whose name rhymes with Mave Datthews. We figured we better get this one out of our system well in advance of the big shows coming up at JPJ (check next week for a bounty of DMB excitement from days gone by). Also, this week, just to fan the Puritan flames, we remind you, after last week’s visit to UVA by Heff’s people, that Playboy is not the only publication to stir things up by flashing some skin on the cover. Proud we were that week in 2007 when we asked the burning question, Why doesn’t Charlottesville have a strip club, only to find many readers took that as a declaration that Charlottesville needs a strip club. Needs? Maybe. Deserves? Definitely. Keep those cards and letters coming, folks. All year long we will continue to look back at the accumulated pluck and provocations that will power this free and freethinking institution into the next 20 years. 

Getting Covered
 

Fill in the blank, people. Those were the instructions. Ever wonder why we’re missing a stadium-seating movie theater in Charlottesville? Or a Lord & Taylor? Or, for that matter, a gentlemen’s club? We researched those questions in the June 26, 2007 issue. We illustrated our queries explicitly (but not all that explicitly, come on) on the cover. We got a buttload, er, boatload of criticism from some quarters. Good times. Good, good times.

Paging Through the Archives

“It looked for a while like the sheen was wearing off the [sic] The Dave Matthews Band as attendance at the Tuesday night concerts at Trax nightclub was slipping from the 350 range to about 250. But things perked up a bit on Friday, April 24 when the band played to a nearly packed house—about 600 people. Among them was Shannon Worrell, of the now-defunct Paris Match, who climbed onstage for one number.

“Those who came to see the 6-man C-ville band heard such standby numbers as ‘Satellite’ and ‘Two-Step’ and the rest of the rollicking band’s repertoire. Some have speculated that the attendance drop might have come from a lack of new material. ‘We’re working on new songs, but we don’t have anything yet,’ Dave Matthews told Arts Watch recently while walking down Main Street. Maybe the grizzled bandleader, pictured here, is seeking inspiration for new songs.”

“Arts Watch,” April 29, 1992

 

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

With this, the 13th issue of the year, we’re a quarter of the way through our highly selective tour through the past 20 years of local news and arts in C-VILLE. And we cannot deny a trend: Certain names keep coming up, often associated with grand ideas that sometimes…fizzle later. Need an example? Here’s one: Lee Danielson floating the notion 10 years ago of building some kind of striking, er, landmark downtown. Not that gotcha journalism, as they say in the GOP, defines our mission here. We can get flowery and soft, too. But whether it’s a new wrinkle on a familiar tale or a market-driven adjustment ($18 New York strip steak? Hello?), stay tuned. All year long we will continue to look back at the accumulated pluck and provocations that will power this free and freethinking institution into the next 20 years. 

 

Getting covered

It was all pun and games back on March 19, 1991, when the C-Ville Review, then a biweekly, featured a fetching lass, an umbrella and some flora on the cover. And what did the spring showers photo connect to inside? You guessed it: Zippo! Indeed, this note graced the bottom of the Contents page for that issue: “Of course there is nothing in this magazine about spring or rain. But doesn’t Alexandra Scott look wonderful tiptoeing through the tulips!” Aah, those were the days when irreverence and low expectations formed a perfect union.

Paging through the archives

“Don’t go rushing out to buy stock just yet. Right now it’s just an idea—but it’s cooking.

 “Lee Danielson (of the Ice Park and Regal Cinema fame) is floating the concept of a giant domed stadium which would be located Downtown, right across from the Omni—on land that is now a sea of asphalt and a bargain grocery store.

 

 “By becoming the number one tenant, the University of Virginia could replace U-Hall (the smallest basketball arena in the ACC) without investing as many millions or enduring all the headaches of upkeep. The space could also be used for graduations, maybe the circus, concerts, or any number of events. Sources tell us Danielson is in conversation now with potential investors.

“This won’t be our last word on Danielson’s Dome—we’re quite sure we will revisit the idea in these pages. For now, we have a quick two cents.

“Yes, we’re sorta warm to the idea. In fact, ift could be pretty cool to have a major-events enclosed stadium within walking distance of the Mall. It deserves a hearing for sure.

“Problem: How to reconcile our attraction to a Downtown arena with our opposition to the Meadowcreek Parkway. If the Dome gains a following, you know folks will start crying for expressway access to Downtown—a.k.a. the Parkway. And then there’s the parking—ugh. That’s a hurdle and a half.

“Besides those issues, we’d like to suggest that Danielson’s team of Dome planners involve the Chamber of Commerce and see if the project might be combined with convention center space. And we also think it would be a terrific idea to combine the facility with a local history museum—complete with a Lewis and Clark (and Sacagawea and York) exhibit.

“Just some ideas. We’ll talk later.”

“The Skinny,” March 30, 1999

 

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

We’re now almost a quarter of the way through our highly selective tour through the past 20 years of local news and arts in C-VILLE. And we’ve started to notice a trend: The more things change, the more they stay the same—at least in the past decade or so. The Cavaliers get a new basketball coach and property is concentrated in the hands of a powerful few. That’s the news this week—and the news from a few years back, too. Whether it’s a new wrinkle on a familiar tale, or something old that sounds new (wine from Hungary, anyone?), stay tuned. All year long we will continue to look back at the accumulated pluck and provocations that will power this free and freethinking institution into the next 20 years. 

 

Paging through the archives

“But while development continues on 29N, many existing structures remain vacant in and around Charlottesville. A scan by C-VILLE of empty buildings in the area found 1,199,088 square feet of unused space…. With abundant real estate in locations like the former supermarket across from the Omni Hotel and the Boxer Learning building on the Downtown Mall, why are developers skipping the empty spaces and choosing to break new ground on 29N?

“The answer, according to Ivo Romenesko, a professional real estate agent, president of the Appraisal Group, and chairman-elect of the Charlottesville Regional Chamber of Commerce, is population and job growth in Albemarle County.

“‘Over 80 percent of all major retailing is located along that 29 corridor,’ Romenesko says. ‘We’re going to see a continuation of that trend.’

“Additionally, the most practical means of development along roads like 29N is to merely knock down an existing Radio Shack or Home Depot and erect a new building, since strip mall and big box retail spaces are relatively cheap and simple to bulldoze and build.”

Paul Fain, December 9, 2003

 

Getting covered

Four years gone by and the story is rather unchanged over at the UVA men’s basketball program. In our March 22, 2005 issue Eric Hoover examined the events leading to the ouster of coach Pete Gillen, which itself led the way to…the ouster of Dave Leitao:  “As expectations soared, the men’s basketball team turned into an annual overhyped and underachieving enigma. Over six seasons, the Hoos won some big games, nearly all of them at University Hall. On the road, they piled up a heap of excruciating defeats: blowout losses, close losses, losses that inspired new cuss words. Throughout the Commonwealth, a generation of televisions bit the dust on game days, and Gillen went from genius to goat.

“This season, the coach who once remarked that Duke basketball was on TV more than ‘Leave It To Beaver’ re-runs found himself trapped in the same bad episode—the one in which his team displays moments of brilliance, then ties itself to the tracks before a freight train of an ACC foe plows through it. The Hoos became a book of basketball mysteries, whose chapters included ‘Who Guarded the In-Bounds Play?’ and ‘The Purloined Pass.’”
 

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

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We’re now almost a quarter of the way through our highly selective tour through the past two decades of local news and arts in C-VILLE. Already, we’ve touted our early jump on various bandwagons (hello, DMB; hello, green building), and this week, in light of the fight in Orange County over situating a Wal-Mart near the Wilderness Battlefield, a revered marker of Civil War history, we recall our story on Wal-Mart’s everyday low wages and the gender discrimination suit the planet’s largest retailer faced five years ago. So stay tuned, as we keep looking back at the accumulated pluck and provocations that will power this still free and still freethinking institution into the next 20 years. 

 

Paging through the archives

“Ironically, founder Sam Walton’s rules for building a retail business include valuing ‘associates’ and sharing rewards. Last year, Wal-Mart generated $265 billion in revenue and had about $9.1 billion in net income. Today there are 5,000 stores in 10 countries, including Argentina, South Korea and China. When Walton died in 1992, he was second only to Bill Gates for title of the world’s richest man.

“The impressive growth has come at a high price. In May, Good Jobs First, a nonprofit research center that promotes corporate and government accountability, released a report showing Wal-Mart received more than $1 billion in subsidies from local and state governments, including sales tax rebates, free or reduced-priced land, tax-increment-financing, state corporate income tax credits and property tax abatements.”

Geri L. Dreiling, October 12, 2004

 

 

Getting covered

In this May 5, 1996 cover story, John Blackburn asserted, “We Charlottesvillians, in particular, live in a Car Town, though the automotive culture is invisible to most…” In the 13 intervening years, it’s become impossible to make the claim that we can’t perceive the car culture that, ‘scuse us, drives this town. The fight over the Meadowcreek Parkway and the nonstop complaints about driver etiquette that populate The Rant make that perfectly clear. But do we live any longer, as Blackburn claimed, in a Volvo Town? For sheer numbers, the Swedish box might outnumber the Prius, but when it comes to self-image, we would say that these days Charlottesvillians see themselves as hybrid pioneers. Here’s hoping the time comes soon when we have more potent visions of being a Mass Transit Town, or our notion of ourselves as a Pedestrian Village takes hold in reality.

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

We’re now into the third month of our highly selective tour through the past two decades of local news and arts in C-VILLE. Already, we’ve touted our early jump on the Obama bandwagon (remember, this is the paper that projected DMB’s rise to the top), and this week, in light of our cover story about local agitators, we highlight our own determination to agitate by reprinting an excerpt from a 1999 piece about what other alternative publications in town at the time thought of us. So stay tuned as we keep looking back at the accumulated pluck and pizzazz that will power this still free and still free-thinking institution into the next 20 years. 

Paging through the archives

“The anonymous editor of David Scott is not a big C-VILLE fan. ‘I’ve rarely been more angered by anything than this issue [“Know your neighbors?”—the list of convicted sex offenders published January 12]. It’s the worst kind of shock journalism… Let’s contribute to the paranoia.’
   …The other weeklies in town—The Observer and The Declaration—seem less hostile. ‘I certainly don’t hate C-VILLE,’ says Sydney Burtner at The Observer. ‘Part of its purpose is to raise people’s ire. That’s part of the goal.’”

Lisa Provence, February 9, 1999

Getting covered

At the time this November 9, 2004, cover appeared, the term “going green” gave off a whiff of quaintness rather than a pungent odor of urgency. But C-VILLE, we’re proud to say, was there to push environmental issues to the forefront of our consciousness. And we’re still pushing, especially in our monthly insert ABODE (check out the latest issue this week) with its regular “Green Scene” feature and many other nods to what “going green” actually means and how to do it—it ain’t that hard.

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

We’re now into the second month of our highly selective tour through the past two decades of local news and arts in C-VILLE. Already, we’ve touted our early jump on the Obama bandwagon (remember, this is the paper that projected DMB’s rise to the top), and this week, for those of you who had some issues with our recent Valentine’s Day photo essay, we dug up an example of what some might regard as real political incorrectness, the winner of our 2001 photo contest. So stay tuned as we keep looking back at the accumulated pluck and pizzazz that will power this still free and still free-thinking institution into the next 20 years. 

Paging through the archives

 

“An ode to photos

A picture speaks a thousand words, or so the saying goes.
And our winning pics, this year, will have you on your toes.
O’er many tempting entries we pondered and we gazed,
and when you see the winners, we think you’ll be amazed!
For Charlottesville is full, you see,
of shutterbugs who, full of glee,
snapped shots of women, kids, and dog,
a haunting goth, but not a frog.
So when our next contest rolls ‘round,
send in your photos by the pound,
and we’ll review them, as we do,
to bring glory to us and you."

October 2, 2001

 

 

 

Getting covered

 

On October 29, 1991, C-VILLE readers were greeted with a cover image that was either an extremely minimalist drawing of a row of tree trunks, or the world’s largest bar code. Either way, it made no sense—until you turned to page 3 and saw the following explanation: “Yes, it’s a generic cover, but we must cut back for the duration of these recessionary times. If for any reason you are not satisfied with this magazine, we will double your money back.” Free paper…money back…get it? In these latest recessionary—dare we say depressionary?—times,” even lame humor is welcome.

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

We’re now into the second month of our highly selective tour through the past two decades of local news and arts in C-VILLE. Already, we’ve touted our early jump on the Obama bandwagon (remember, this is the paper that projected DMB’s rise to the top), and this week we revisit some music news to jive with our current cover story, including a snippet of our very first review of a Gravity Lounge show from the year the club opened. So stay tuned as we keep looking back at the accumulated pluck and pizzazz that will power this still free and still free-thinking institution into the next 20 years. 

Paging through the archives

“Critical darlings of folk Devon Sproule and Paul Curreri rounded out a three-week tour through the Northeast and Midwest with a naturally brilliant, if somewhat uninspired, performance at the Gravity Lounge Friday, November 21. About 120 local music lovers made a committed fan base of all ages, though heavily skewed toward an audience of scruffy-looking hipster 20somethings whose tattoos peaked out from beneath collared shirts. According to Gravity Lounge owner Bill Baldwin, it was the fourth-largest turnout on record for the five-month-old venue. The largest? A late August Sproule/Curreri show that featured the debut opening performance of Lauren Hoffman and The Lilas.”

Ben Sellers, December 2, 2003

 

Getting covered

For those of you who have been considering what it might take to save the Gravity Lounge, our September 23, 1997, cover is a sobering sight. At that point, the Charlottesville music club Trax—one of the venues that helped launch Dave Matthews Band—was about to celebrate its 15th year of existence, and C-VILLE’s Bill Chapman was brimming with suggestions about the right kinds of bookings that could “save the soul” of the club (i.e., keep it a burgeoning business).  Well, it kept on rolling for a few more years, and then in 2001 became, under a new owner, a country and western club called Max, and closed for good in 2003.

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

We’re now into the second month of our highly selective tour through the past two decades of local news and arts in C-VILLE. Already, we’ve touted our early jump on the Obama bandwagon (remember, this is the paper that projected DMB’s rise to the top), and this week we revisit some old Downtown construction blues so that the current mess will just seem par for the course. So stay tuned as we keep looking back at the accumulated pluck and pizzazz that will power this still free and still free-thinking institution into the next 20 years. 

Paging through the archives

“’The rest of us want to get finished fast,’ says Rick Jones, an executive with Management Services, a major property management firm located next to the muddy pit that is [Oliver] Kuttner’s construction site. ‘It’s an inconvenience,’ says Jones of the mess. ‘It’s an eyesore; it’s unattractive. He sort of owes it to Downtown to do it expeditiously.’

…Kuttner says the critics just don’t understand—that what he’s attempting will transform what Charlottesville old-timers call the Woolworth’s building into as many as 11 retail spaces and 28 apartments. Since he began excavating nearly a year ago, Kuttner’s been building above and below an existing business, a shore store that’s one of the last gasps of the shrunken Woolworth’s empire: Foot Locker.”

Hawes Spencer, February 8, 2000

 

Getting covered

We swore that during this anniversary year we would take take some pot shots at ourselves as well as preen our feathers. This February 19, 1992, cover isn’t exactly a miracle of art direction. In fact, there’s essentially no art to it, and the design is rudimentary at best. The less loquacious of you out there might appreciate its brevity, but grammarians everywhere would agree that the exclamation point is working way too hard. If you’ve never thought to appreciate the design of our covers now, a little comparison should help spur you in that direction. 

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

We’re now into the second month of our highly selective tour through the past two decades of local news and arts in C-VILLE. Already, we’ve touted our early jump on the Obama bandwagon (remember, this is the paper that projected DMB’s rise to the top), and revisited Market Street Wineshop’s Robert Harllee’s secret to staying warm—below the belt—in the winter, just to name a few things. So stay tuned as we keep looking back at the accumulated pluck and pizzazz that will power this still free and still free-thinking institution into the next 20 years.

Paging through the archives

 

“Local real estate professionals, through their association, The Charlottesville Area Association of Realtors (CAAR) now have their own mass circulation publication. The Charlottesville Area Real Estate Weekly, its first issue fifty-six pages long…hit the street February 12. …Faced with a weak housing market, a perception of high advertising rates at the daily paper, and a wish for a publication they could call their own, CAAR may be joining a trend toward association-owned publications. ‘I expect that in the next two years, it’ll be a huge trend,’ says Christopher E. Haring, who manages a real estate weekly in Asheville, North Carolina, for the association that owns it. ‘I’ve talked to 50 or 60 [real estate groups] who are doing the same thing.’”

February 10, 1992

 

Getting covered

 

Ah, remember the good old days when our housing crisis was merely that the darn things were ridiculously expensive? Our June 8, 2004 cover story got to the heart of the difficulty of affording a house in Charlottesville.  Now our reporters’ searchlights are trained on the fact that for some people it’s not about buying new homes, but about trying to keep the ones they have. “Get over it” is a phrase we’ll put aside for now.

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

We’re bigger, older and wiser. Over the past two decades, we’ve sometimes been well ahead of the curve, like when we projected DMB’s rise to the top, and sometimes we’ve been, well, wrong. We’ve captured people saying things they might regret later; we’ve championed the underdog (hello, Congressman Perriello!). Each week, as we celebrate our 20th anniversary, we’ll take you on a highly selective tour through all of it. Yeah, we might look and feel different than we did back in the day, but in two decades of reporting on Charlottesville and Albemarle, a couple of things have remained constant: C-VILLE is still free and it’s still free-thinking.

Paging through the archives

"As long as I am physically able, I will not sell the Vinegar Hill or allow it to change in any way. I love looking out of the porthole at the people while they are watching the movies."—Ann Porotti as told to Barbara Rich, January 11, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

Virgil goes to Washington! That was the C-VILLE cover story back on April 29, 1997, a few months after the then-freshman Congressman had taken his seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. Before that, he’d spent 25 years in the General Assembly. And now…well, as of January 6, Virgil’s not on the Hill anymore. Tom goes to Washington!

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

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Twenty years of local news and arts in the spotlight

We’re bigger, older and wiser. Over the past two decades, we’ve sometimes been well ahead of the curve, like when we projected DMB’s rise to the top, and sometimes we’ve been, well, wrong. We’ve captured people saying things they might regret later; we’ve championed the underdog (hello, Congressman Perriello!). Each week, as we celebrate our 20th anniversary, we’ll take you on a highly selective tour through all of it. Yeah, we might look and feel different than we did back in the day, but in two decades of reporting on Charlottesville and Albemarle, a couple of things have remained constant: C-VILLE is still free and it’s still free-thinking.

Paging through the archives

“CLARIFICATION:
Just hours after the last issue of C-Ville Review hit the stands, we received a phone call from the president of the Junior League. Janice Wilcox objected to an item in ‘The Bottom Line,’ in which Ace speculated that there may be some crossover in membership between the League and the Downtown Ladies Association, a social club for lesbians. Apparently unaware of C-Ville Review’s tongue-in-cheek manner, Mrs. Wilcox asked that we dispel any notion that the two groups have any members in common. Said she, ‘There is no crossover in membership.’” (February 5, 1991)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Getting covered

Considering that a no-brainer, George W. Bush, is stepping down from the presidency this week, it’s a no-brainer to highlight—both directly and indirectly—the rise of the first African-American president, Barack Obama Our February 20, 2007 cover story told of how 4,000 Democrats flocked to Richmond to see “the rock star,” and our January 18, 2000 cover story recounted Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1963 visit to our fair city.

 

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